Browsed by
Tag: windows10

Creating a Working Windows 11 Installation Disc

Creating a Working Windows 11 Installation Disc

Hi everyone,

In this post, we will see the steps to follow to make a working Windows 11 Installation Disc. The leaked ISO file currently only works if a machine has Secure Boot enabled and has a Trusted Platform Module 2.0 module.

It seems that these requirements are not really needed, at least in this build, but the installer will not let us move forward with the installation if a machine does not satisfies these requirements. This post will make you have a working installation disc. Note that these steps create a Windows 11 x64 installation disc, which will only work on x64 capable processors. With this in mind, let’s start.

First, you’ll need to have a Windows 10 installation ISO file. If you don’t have one, you can download and generate the ISO file yourself, by going to https://uup.rg-adguard.net and downloading the generation script for the latest version of Windows 10:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 1

Windows will complain that the script “can harm your PC”. You can simply ignore this warning and store the file. You’ll need to run it in order to generate the ISO file. Now, this process will take some time, so go grab a Coffee, or take a walk, go to gym or find some other activity to do while the script creates the ISO for you.

In the end, you should have the ISO file generated in the same folder as the batch script:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 2

The next step will be to mount the image:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 3

This will create a virtual CD-ROM drive with the image mounted in it:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 4

Make note of the drive letter as you’ll need this later.

You’ll now need to use a tool called ImgBurn. You can grab it from https://imgburn.com:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 5

You’re going to click on “Create image file from files/folder” or “Write files/folders to disc”, and go to the “Advanced” tab, followed by the “Bootable Disc” tab. Here, you’re going to mark the option to “Make Image Bootable”, select the mounted virtual CD-ROM drive, and click the small save icon:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 6

Save it anywhere you’d like. Here I saved it in the location that has the Windows 11 ISO:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 7

ImgBurn will promt you if you would like to use this image as the boot image. Click “Yes”:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 8

This screen should now look like this:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 9

The next step is to click on the “Show Disc Layout Editor” button. If you don’t see it, click on the icon on the left below the text saying “Free Space”:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 9.5
Windows 11 Install Workaround 10

Once the new dialog opens, drag and drop everything from the mounted image into the ImgBurn window:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 11

Now, we will need to either mount or extract the Windows 11 ISO. We are interested on a file called install.wim from it.

Windows 11 Install Workaround 12

This file is located inside the “sources” folder. So, in both ImgBurn and in the extracted/mounted Windows 11 image, go to that folder:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 13

You are now going to drag and drop it into ImgBurn. When asked what to do, click on “Replace”:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 14

This file will replace the Windows 10 install.wim file:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 15

Close the window. ImgBurn may ask you if you want to use the correct filesystem for a bootable disc. Click “Yes”:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 16

We are now ready to burn this on-the-fly image to a disc. If you selected to create an image, switch to drive mode by clicking on the little burning disc icon:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 17

Select the drive to use and initiate the burning process. Note that you’ll need a DVD+/-R DL disc, or a BD-R/RE disc as this image is a bit bigger than what would fit on a regular DVD disc:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 18

I used a BD-RE disc. If you use a rewritable disc, you may be required to erase it. Click “Yes” if prompted:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 19

Next we are asked about the name of the disc. I simply wrote “Windows 11” here. Click “Yes”:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 20

We will now confirm everything by clicking “Ok”:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 21

The disc burning will start. I recommend you also mark the “Verify” option. We don’t want to have a broken installation disc after all:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 22

Once the disc is burned, the verification stage will start. If you use a laptop drive, you may be prompted to close it and press “Ok”. Desktop drives do not have to do that, as the software will cycle the drive automatically. It will then load the disc and start the verification process:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 23

Once the verification process is complete, we will have a working bootable disc:

Windows 11 Install Workaround 24
Windows 11 Install Workaround 25

In the next post, we will attempt to install Windows 11 with this new disc.

Quick fix for Ubuntu WSL failing to update because of systemd

Quick fix for Ubuntu WSL failing to update because of systemd

Hi everyone,

I’m a user of the Windows 10 WSL feature, where I run the Ubuntu distribution and always install the latest versions. I like to keep my packages up to date. Unfortunately, the latest Ubuntu release, 21.04 was not installed correctly and whenever I tried to update the system packages, it would error out when setting up systemd.

WSL Fix systemd 1

The solution to this seem to be a quick one. Turns out, the file libsystemd-shared-247.so was there, in the /usr/lib/systemd folder:

WSL Fix systemd 2

It seems that we can get around this issue by copying that file to the previous folder (/usr/lib, so the following command should be used:

sudo cp /usr/lib/systemd/libsystemd-shared-247.so /usr/lib/

Now, go back to the previous folder and you should have it there:

WSL Fix systemd 3

Now you should be able to update your system packages without issues.

But now I’m getting this failure 😂:

WSL Fix systemd 4
How to install Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 18875

How to install Windows 10 Insider Preview Build 18875

Hi everyone,

Today, I finally managed to install Windows 10 Insider Preview, build 18875. Previosuly, I was getting an error with code 0xca00a000.

Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 1
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 1

After reading around the Feedback hub, it seems that disabling the Windows Search service and deleting the content of the Windows SoftwareDistribution folder fixes this, and the update is able to be installed succesful. Here, I’ll show you step by step how to do it.

Disabling the Windows Search service

First, press the keys Win + R and type services.msc, then press OK:

Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 2
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 2

The Windows Services management console will open. Go down and right click on the Windows Search service. You’ll click on Properties:

Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 3
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 3

Once you are in Properties, go to the Startup type drop down and select Disabled. Then, press OK:

Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 4
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 4

Right click on Windows Search again, and click on Stop:

Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 5
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 5

You may be prompted to disable other services. Press Yes:

Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 6
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 6

The Windows Search service should now be stopped.

Cleaning the SoftwareDistribution folder

The next step involves navigating to C:\Windows\SoftwareDistribution and deleting everything inside:

Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 7
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 7
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 8
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 8

You may be prompted to give administrator permissions in order to delete the contents. Press Continue:

Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 9
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 9

The contents will be deleted:

Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 10
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 10

And the folder will be empty:

Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 11
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 11

Now, on Windows Update, press Retry:

Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 12
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 12

It will begin getting ready, downloading, and installing the update:

Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 13
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 13
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 14
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 14

Finally, you’ll be prompted to restart your machine. Click on Restart Now:

Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 15
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 15

Everything should run smoothly now and the update should install fine:

Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 16
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 16
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 17
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 17

Once the installation finishes, you’ll be on the 18875 build of Windows 10:

Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 18
Installing Windows 10 Insider Preview 18875 18

That’s it! Hope these steps were useful in getting you to install Windows 10 Insider Preview build 18875!

Can’t get Windows 10 Insider Preview build 18875 to install…

Can’t get Windows 10 Insider Preview build 18875 to install…

UPDATE 4/13/2019: Yesterday, I published how to install build 18875. Click here to read the post.

Hi everyone,

Today, Microsoft released Windows 10 Insider Preview build 18875, but I’m unable to install it on my machines. For some reason, it fails at 7% when it’s configuring the update when attempting to restart, and then, if I try to download the update again, it returns a 0xca00a00 error.

I removed the contents in C:\windows\SoftwareDistribution\Download and it seems to be able to download the update again, but it still fails at 7% when restarting.

Hopefully, Microsoft will release an updated build sometime this week. Downloading the ISO also didn’t worked, as it fails at 100% giving an installation error…

Using the Hidizs AP80 as a Micro SD reader

Using the Hidizs AP80 as a Micro SD reader

Hi everyone,

It comes a time when I have to update my Windows devices manually because sometimes, on my Intel Atom machines, Windows Update fails to install a Windows Insider build. I know I’m not the only one who have had this happened. One thing one can do to solve this is to go ahead and download a Windows Insider ISO and then create a bootable micro SD card, with tools like Rufus. Now, the bootable part is not important, as I’m upgrading my Windows install rather than doing a clean install.

I used an 8gb MicroSD card that I have and used Rufus on my AMD Ryzen desktop machine. I then used my Hidizs AP80 in USB Storage mode to make the microSD card appear in the PC and format and prepare the card with the ISO. Once that was ready, I used the Hidizs USB-C to Micro USB cable that came with my Hidizs DH1000 (the Hidizs AP80 also comes with this cable) to connect the USB-C port of the AP80 to the Micro USB port of the tablet. From there, I was able to go to “This PC” -> The Micro SD card and launch the Windows 10 setup to begin upgrading my tablet. It is really nice that the Hiby OS that this DAP use has different modes when it comes to USB, because you can either use it as a Storage device or as a DAC.

Here’s the image where I have my AP80 connected to my tablet:

Using the Hidizs AP80 as a Micro SD reader
Windows and Linux can work together. How to execute a Linux command from Visual Basic?

Windows and Linux can work together. How to execute a Linux command from Visual Basic?

Hi everyone,

In this post, I’d like to show you how easy it is to connect your Windows software to linux commands and software.

As you may know, Windows now includes the Windows Subsystem for Linux (WSL), which allows you to run a bash terminal and execute linux utilites as well as install software from the repository. Now, this is not virtualized. Rather, it uses a compatibility layer which allows it to execute linux tools on Windows.

This is not installed by default but can be installed by going into Control Panel, click on Turn Windows features on or off:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 1

You then select and install WLS:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 2

It may ask for a restart, and once it’s done, you simply launch bash.exe:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 3

Which will present you with the terminal:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 4

Perfect

But now, let’s say you want to automate something, and you are an expert using Visual Basic.NET or C#, and there’s this tool or script that runs on Linux that you want to execute. Can it be done? Sure it can!

From the CMD (Command Prompt), you can also launch a linux tool by simply invoking bash -c the tool to use. For example, if I’d like to launch python3, I would just use bash -c python3:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 5

When I hit Enter, I’ll go into Python running on a bash terminal but it’s redirected into CMD. This basically allows us to interact with Linux from the Windows Command Prompt:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 6

Interesting, right?

Then, how do you launch a linux script, tool, software, etc, from a VB.NET app?
EASY! Basically, we will use ProcessStartInfo, launch bash.exe and pass the -c parameter followed by what we want to run.

Here, let’s make a mini tutorial based on my script to get my Steem Followers:

This is the Python script I made that interacts with the Piston lib to get my follower count:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 7

To use it, I have to launch the script along with the username of the account I’d like to know the followers. That’s what I’ll show in this mini tutorial.

We will be using Microsoft’s Visual Studio 2017.

First: Let’s create a new project in Visual Studio. This project will be a Windows Forms App in the Visual Basic language. I’ve named it SteemGetFollowers (This project will be uploaded into GitHub. See the end of this post for links):

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 8

Once we create the project, we will see an empty form:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 9

From the Toolbox, we will add a TextBox and a Button. The TextBox is for us to enter our Steem username, and the button will be to call the script and show our follower number in a MessageBox or MsgBox (Both do the same):

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 10

Let’s make it look like this:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 11

We’ll change the Button1 name to Get Follower Count!. For this, click the button, and change the Text property:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 12

We can also change the Form1 name to something better. We’ll do the steps like the button, but instead clicking on the Form:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 13

Now, we have our form complete.

Next step?

We have to make sure our software compiles as x64. For this, we’ll select where it says Any CPU at the right of Debug and we’ll click on Configuration Manager:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 14

Here, we’ll select <New…>:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 15

Make sure it says x64 and press OK:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 16

Now, the Active Platform will change to x64. We can now Close the window:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 17

If you haven’t done so, save the project by clicking on the Floppy icon:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 18
WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 19

Once done, we’ll go to the project folder, which, if saved on the default path, should be in Documents\Visual Studio 2017\Projects\SteemGetFollowers\SteemGetFollowers\bin\x64\Debug. There, we will copy the script file, because when we build the software, it will find the script to launch in this folder:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 20

We have configure our project now! Let’s write code!

Now, let’s write the code. Double click on the Button and we should be directed to a pre-made code:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 21

Inside the Private Sub that it made, we will write a code to launch bash along with python and the script. For this, we will use ProcessStartInfo:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 22

Now, we simply show a simple message with the follower number using MsgBox:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 22.5

So, our code should look like this:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 23

We’re done!

Now, we will press the Start button to test our software:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 24

It should compile pretty fast, and once the software lauches, we will write our Steem Username in the TextBox and press the Get Follower Count! button:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 25

The result will be:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 26

And that’s it!

We have successfully written a software that interacts with the Linux bash terminal! This way, we can build awesome Windows software that interacts with our Python scripts inside Linux.

Note that when we compile the software, we will see the executables in the folder where we copied the Python script:

WSL VB.NET Tutorial - Steemit Followers - 27

The Python script file should be in the same folder as the executable for it to work. Also, the software must be compiled as 64bit or it will not find the bash executable.

GitHub Links:

You can get this project and check it out for yourself by going to the following repo:
https://github.com/moisespr123/SteemGetFollowers

Here, you can find the Python script:
https://github.com/moisespr123/SteemGetFollowers/blob/master/SteemGetFollowers/getFollowersCount.py

Hope you enjoyed this tutorial!!

Shall you have any questions, feel free to leave me a comment!

Emojis are coming to Windows 10!

Emojis are coming to Windows 10!

In Windows 10 build 16215, available for those who participate in the Windows Insider Program and are in the Fast Ring, Microsoft introduced the ability to use emojis, so you can now easily use them in your posts and comments.

It’s very easy to use them! You just have to press the WIN + . keys, and the emojis will pop up! Then, you select the emoji you would like to use 😜

Windows 10 Emojis - 1

1. Go to Start and press the gear icon (Settings)

Windows 10 Emojis - 2

2. Go to “Update & Security”

Windows 10 Emojis - 3

3. Go to “Windows Insider Program”

Here, you should be able to join the Windows Insider Program. I don’t see the option to join because I’m already part of it, but basically, you accept and then your PC will restart. Then, follow steps 1 and 2 and change the ring to “Fast” so you can receive the latest preview version of Windows 10. Please note that by joining this program, your PC could experience crashes or have issues you didn’t have before. Personally, I’ve never had any major problems testing these preview versions 🙂.

4. Finally, we check for updates by going to “Windows Update”

The latest Windows 10 preview version should show and start downloading. If it doesn’t show, don’t worry, as it can take some time for it to appear.

Windows 10 Emojis - 4

5. Wait for the download to finish and install, then restart the PC

It can take a while depending on your internet and computer speed.

6. Wait for the installation to finish

This can take half and hour or more, especially if your PC has a Hard Disk Drive instead of a Solid State Disk.

7. Once the update finishes and you see the desktop, you can start using the emojis 😃

Personally, I use Microsoft Edge. There, you can test the emojis. I haven’t tested any other browsers.

I hope you all liked this post!

Installing Windows 10 Creators Update to the UDOO x86

Installing Windows 10 Creators Update to the UDOO x86

Hi everyone,

Today, I’ll show you a video where I’m installing Windows 10 Creators Update (build 15063) to the UDOO x86. Installing Windows 10 is very easy and while the setup took some time to finish, Windows 10 runs very nice on this board. In fact, I used the UDOO x86 to do the ArduBOINC project you can see by clicking here.

One recommendation is that if you plan on installing big software later, like Visual Studio 2017, I recommend you get an M.2 SSD drive or a 2.5 Hard Disk Drive or SSD, as the 32GB eMMC Storage is not so much and will fill up very fast with the Windows Updates and builds, especially if you participate in the Windows Insider Program as I do. In the video, I’m installing Windows 10 to a 250GB Hard Disk Drive.