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Tag: encoding

new rav1e build (2018/11/06) and updated rav1e_gui

new rav1e build (2018/11/06) and updated rav1e_gui

Hi everyone,

Today, I’ve compiled the latest rav1e code which includes the commits up to yesterday’s.

rav1e 2018-11-06
rav1e.exe

You can download the new build here:

I’ve also updated rav1e_gui to include this new release:

ravie GUI 2018-11-06
rav1e GUI

You can download it here too:

I haven’t made any new encoding test using the latest rav1e versions but I’ll be doing some soon! I’m currently cleaning up my gaming recordings and I’ll be using a clip from those to test these new builds.

As always, enjoy the new release!

new rav1e and opusenc builds – GUI’s updated too!

new rav1e and opusenc builds – GUI’s updated too!

Hi everyone,

Today, I have released new builds for opusenc and rav1e. Also, the GUI’s got updated.

rav1e

rav1e 2018-11-01
rav1e.exe

rav1e got updated to commit 392be13. Download it here:

rav1e GUI

rav1e GUI 2018-11-01
rav1e GUI

rav1e GUI was updated to include above’s rav1e build. Download it here:

opusenc:

opusenc 2018-11-01
opusenc.exe

opus has been updated recently, so I build opus-tools again to include the changes from the opus repository. Download it here:

opus GUI:

Opus GUI 2018-11-01
Opus GUI

As with rav1e GUI, I’ve updated Opus GUI to include the latest opusenc version. Download it here:

Enjoy!

Introducing rav1e_gui v1.1 and updated rav1e builds

Introducing rav1e_gui v1.1 and updated rav1e builds

Hi everyone,

Yesterday, I released rav1e_gui v1.1. This build adds 2 new options which are related to my contribution toward the rav1e project I talked in this post. The Pull Request got accepted, so every rav1e builds coming forward will have these 2 new options:

  • Keyframe Interval – Allows you to specify a keyframe interval. Before, it was locked to one keyframe per 30 frames, but now the user can choose this interval by using the –keyint or -I flags.
  • Low Latency Mode – Enabled by default. Basically, disabling this enables frame reordering during encoding.

The GUI now adds these 2 new options and also provides another option to keep or remove the temporary files produced during encoding.

rav1e GUI V1.1
rav1e GUI V1.1

You can download this new build here, which also features today’s rav1e build:

New rav1e build

rav1e 2018-10-28

The latest rav1e_gui comes with today’s build, but you can also download the standalone encoder here:

Enjoy!

Contributing to the rav1e AV1 encoder software

Contributing to the rav1e AV1 encoder software

Hi everyone,

Yesterday I had my first experience writing code in Rust. I decided to implement 2 command-line options for the rav1e AV1 encoder software that I’ve been playing around for some days.

The encoder currently encodes files with a keyframe every 30 frames. This value is hardcoded into the code and can’t be changed by the user unless it is changed at the code and rav1e is compiled again. Also, there is a new option which is called “Compound mode” in the source code, which can also be enabled or disabled by sending a boolean value of true or false.

To give more power to the user, I added these 2 command-line options:

  • –low_latency, to enable compound mode. Default is false.
  • keyint, or -I, to specify a value for the keyframe interval. Default is 30.

This is currently waiting approval. You can see this Pull Request here: https://github.com/xiph/rav1e/pull/677

New rav1e build and updated rav1e_gui (2018/10/23)

New rav1e build and updated rav1e_gui (2018/10/23)

Hi everyone,

Today, I’ve compiled the latest rav1e source code, bringing it to commit 6bfa0aa:

rav1e 2018-10-23

I’m releasing 2 versions of today’s build. One which have compound mode turned on by default and another one with it disabled. The source code originally has this disabled (reorder=false). You can download both versions here:

I’ve also updated rav1e_gui to include this new release. It uses the compound-enabled version:

rav1e GUI 2018-10-23

You can download it here:

I’ve started a distributed encoding task so I should have a sample encode with this version pretty soon. As usual, my encoding parameters are: –quantizer 175 -s 0 which provides excellent results with a low file size.

Enjoy!

New rav1e build and updated rav1e_gui (2018/10/22)

New rav1e build and updated rav1e_gui (2018/10/22)

Hi everyone,

Today, I’ve compiled the latest rav1e source code, bringing it to commit c69ac5c:

rav1e 2018-10-22

You can download it here:

I’ve also updated rav1e_gui to include this new release:

rav1e GUI 2018-10-22

You can download it here:

Enjoy!

new opusenc and rav1e builds and opus_gui and rav1e_gui updated

new opusenc and rav1e builds and opus_gui and rav1e_gui updated

Hi everyone,

Today, I’ve released new standalone builds of opusenc and rav1e and updated opus_gui and rav1e_gui to include these new builds:

opusenc.exe

opusenc.exe
opusenc.exe

Download:

opus_gui

Opus GUI
Opus GUI

Download:

rav1e.exe

rav1e.exe
rav1e.exe

Download:

rav1e_gui

rav1e GUI
rav1e GUI

Download:

Enjoy the new builds!

Distributed AV1 Video Encoding

Distributed AV1 Video Encoding

Hi everyone,

Yesterday, I began working on writing code to encode video files to AV1 in a distributed computing fashion using my private BOINC server. I wrote some PHP code and developed a Windows Forms software that will submit the video files to the distributed computing server so that it can send jobs to connected machines.

The encoding software I’m using is rav1e. This software is currently single-threaded, which means that encoding videos will take some time, especially when using the –speed 0 flag, which is the slowest mode available nut gives the best quality.

My solution at this time consists on splitting the video files into 1-second segments and then launching a rav1e encoding task for each part, each in one CPU thread. This significantly speeds up the encoding process because it can simultaneously encode several parts depending on the CPU being used. For example, if we split a video into a 1-second segment, and you have an AMD Ryzen 7 2700X CPU, this means that you can process 16 seconds at a time.

Preparing the input video file

As I mentioned at the start, I wrote a Windows Forms software that will handle the video submission process. The software will first call ffmpeg to split the video into 1-second segments, extract the audio file and encode it to Opus using the desired bitrate, and then it will submit the 1-second segment video files to the BOINC server, generating a task for each file:

av1_task_submitter

I’m submitting the video files using a quantizer setting of 175 and a speed of 0.

Once the tasks are generated, comes the processing.

AV1 encoding:

The BOINC client is the software responsible for contacting the server to retrieve the splitted files and initiate the tasks. It will download the rav1e executable from the BOINC server, the input video file, and will start the encoder. This process takes about 2 hours and 30 minutes on an AMD Ryzen 7 2700X CPU while for my Intel i7-3610QM and 4700MQ it took more than 3 hours. Still, the advantage is that I get to encode multiple segments at once, speeding the encoding of the source video significantly.

Here, you can see the encoding tasks from 4 of my machines:

rav1e BOINC Tasks
rav1e BOINC Tasks

Result files:

Once the encoding tasks are finished, they are sent back to the BOINC server which will mark the task as completed and will move the results to a defined folder:

.ifv segments
.ifv segments

Merging the files:

The final step is to merge the result files and also merge the audio file. For this, I wrote a simple bash script that calls ffmpeg’s concat function and then merges the concatenated file with the audio to generate one final .webm file. WebM is s container compatible with AV1 video files as well as Opus audio tracks:

Script to merge the .ifv files into the final .webm file
Script to merge the .ifv files into the final .webm file

The script takes 3 arguments. The first one is the list of files to concatenate, the second is the Opus audio file and the third and final one is the name for the output file.

When we run it, we should see the following at the end:

The merging script after running
The merging script after running

The final file:

We can see the final encoded .webm file at the location we typed when we ran the above script:

The final .webm file
The final .webm file

We can also check the file using MediaInfo:

Mediainfo
Mediainfo

And that’s it! BOINC is really useful in this case as I can encode multiple files and the server will handle all of the processing. The only manual part is where we run the merging script to generate the output file. However, it really speeds encoding by a lot. This is, until rav1e becomes multithreading, at which point, he BOINC server can still be used by changing the app to a multi-threading one.

Hope you enjoyed reading this post!

Downloading ffmpeg for rav1e GUI

Downloading ffmpeg for rav1e GUI

Hi everyone,

Today, I’ll show you the steps to download ffmpeg for the rav1e_gui encoding tool, which requires this to pre-process and post-process video files when encoding them to the new AV1 video format.

Below are the steps:

1. Navigate to https://ffmpeg.zeranoe.com/builds/

ffmpeg Step 1

2. Select the nightly build which is the first one shown in “Version”. Select the 64-bit Windows version if you have a 64-bit machine, and select “Static” in the Linking column. Then, click on “Download Build”:

ffmpeg general step 2

3. Press “Save”:

ffmpeg general step 3

4. When the download finishes, press “Open”:

ffmpeg general step 4

5. Go to the ffmpeg folder:

ffmpeg general step 5

6. Go to the “bin” folder:

ffmpeg general step 6

7. Copy the “ffmpeg.exe” executable:

ffmpeg general step 7

8. Past the “ffmpeg.exe” executable in the location where you extracted rav1e_gui:

rav1e ffmpeg

9. That’s it!

Enjoy!