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The Lenovo Y510p Replacement Fan from Rangale

The Lenovo Y510p Replacement Fan from Rangale

Hi everyone,

Today, we will be seeing a replacement fan from Rangale for the Lenovo Y510p laptop. This is my 3nd replacement fan as 2 has already failed previously:

Lenovo Y510p replacement fans

The last replacement fan actually lasted a whole year, which at least was something. I’m not sure how long the new one will last, but we’ll see since it’s a different brand than the last 2. This fan also comes in a nice branded box, unlike the generic past one.

Lenovo Y510p Replacement Fan from Rangale 1

The fan is the only thing we have inside the box. It fits very nice and is wrapped on a plastic bag:

Here is the fan after taking it out of the bag:

Lenovo Y510p Replacement Fan from Rangale 6

Replacing the fan in this laptop is very easy. We simply need to take out the cover:

Lenovo Y510p Replacement Fan from Rangale 4

We then simply take out 3 small screws:

Lenovo Y510p Replacement Fan from Rangale 5

Here are the old and new fans side-by-side:

Lenovo Y510p Replacement Fan from Rangale 7

They are almost identical, with the fan being from the same brand. Finally, here’s the new fan installed:

Lenovo Y510p Replacement Fan from Rangale 8

So far, the laptop is working at optimum CPU speeds with no throttle. Only time will tell how long this fan will last.

You can get this fan at Amazon at the following link:

The UGREEN 2.5-inch HDD and SSD to USB 3.0 Enclosure

The UGREEN 2.5-inch HDD and SSD to USB 3.0 Enclosure

Hi everyone,

Today, I’m going to show you the UGREEN 2.5-inch HDD and SSD to USB 3.0 Enclosure.

This is a Hard Disk Drive and Solid State Drive enclosure. It converts from SATA to USB 3.0. This is the standard USB model. UGREEN also has a USB-C version of this enclosure that I tested 2 years ago.

The packaging is small and straightforward. UGREEN always make some environmental friendly packages for their products:

We see the enclosure as soon as we open the box:

UGREEN 2.5 HDD to USB 3.0 Enclosure 3

We then have the instruction booklet below:

UGREEN 2.5 HDD to USB 3.0 Enclosure 4

The enclosure is very well protected:

Once it is taken out, it looks very similar to the USB-C model:

The difference being in that this just use a standard USB 3.0 Type B port:

UGREEN 2.5 HDD to USB 3.0 Enclosure 9
UGREEN 2.5 HDD to USB-C enclosure 3

The drive accepts a SATA drive. A hard disk drive or a solid state drive will both work:

The included cable is just a short USB 3.0 cable. It is not a Y splitter cable:

Here I connected the enclosure to my PC:

UGREEN 2.5 HDD to USB 3.0 Enclosure 17

And I ran a quick benchmark on one of the drives. We can see it ran at USB 3.0 speeds. This disk is a bit slow, but the purpose of the enclosure is to reuse them until they finally die:

UGREEN 2.5 to USB 3.0 HDD SSD Enclosure

Conclusion

This Hard Disk Drive enclosure is excellent to use our internal hard disk drives and solid state drives as external drives. You can find this enclosure for $12 or less. It runs at USB 3.0 speeds which means we can make the most of the drive’s technical features. Overall, a nice addition to our daily workflow.

I had 6 drives without a case, so I got 6 of these:

UGREEN 2.5 HDD to USB 3.0 Enclosure 15

I then labeled them to identify them better:

UGREEN 2.5 HDD to USB 3.0 Enclosure 16

My smallest drive is a 120GB drive while the largest are 1TB drives. This is a great way to reuse old laptop’s hard drives.

You can get this enclosure on Amazon at the following link:

The AINOPE 10-feet Active USB 3.0 Extension Cable

The AINOPE 10-feet Active USB 3.0 Extension Cable

Hi everyone,

Today, we will be seeing the AINOPE 10-feet Active USB 3.0 Extension Cable. This is a USB 3.0 extension cable that has a built-in chip that is supposed to improve the signal to prevent transmission issues. It is why it’s called an active cable. The purpose is that we can have a longer USB cable without any negative issues.

This cable comes in a simple packaging which a lot of cable words in it:

Inside, we have the cable in a plastic bag:

AINOPE Active USB 3.0 Extension Cable 10FT 3

The first impressions are that the cable seem to be well made:

AINOPE Active USB 3.0 Extension Cable 10FT 4

The USB female connector side is bigger and larger than usual extension cables since there is where the chip is located. I’m not sure what exact model it uses, but the item description specifies it is an NXP chip (Another competing product specifies that its cable uses a PTN36241B chip):

AINOPE Active USB 3.0 Extension Cable 10FT 5

The male plug is pretty much normal:

AINOPE Active USB 3.0 Extension Cable 10FT 6

I plugged this cable and so far it seems to be doing the job:

AINOPE Active USB 3.0 Extension Cable 10FT 7

The Story behind this purchase

I posted about several hubs I got lately, specifically the Sabrent 10-port and Rosonway 7-port USB hubs. I also have a UGREEN 4-port USB 3.0 hub and a 6-feet UGREEN USB 3.0 extension cable. My setup is seemed to be working great, but suddenly I started having some USB Semaphore Timeout issues that would cause a USB port reset. Whenever I tried to reconnect the cable, Windows would report a Code 31 “Request not supported” Error. Just to try to find the cause of it, I got this cable, but the issue continued happening. Because of this, I know the cause is not this cable, as the issue happens with the other one too. The issue seems to not be the new hubs, as I swapped it and it still happened. Now, my system uses an AMD X570 chipset which is known to have USB issues. I do think there may be some chipset compatibility issues between my system and the hubs. Swapping ports did not help either, and both the front and back panels seem to suffer from this issue. I’m still investigating this, but I can say that this cable is working properly.

Conclusion

This cable offers a 10-feet length that is good if we want to connect something that’s far away from our computers. The build quality seem to be good except for the female connector, where the case is made by plastic, but the connectors itself feels solid. It’s also cheap, so you can get it and improve your workstation setup.

Get this cable on Amazon at the following link:

The Rosonway 7-Port USB 3.0 Hub

The Rosonway 7-Port USB 3.0 Hub

Hi everyone,

Today, we will be seeing the Rosonway 7-Port USB 3.0 Hub, which I got alongside the Sabrent 10-Port USB 3.0 Hub to better organize my USB devices:

This USB hub comes with an average 24-Watt Power Supply. With it, we can power some USB devices like light portable hard drives, but don’t expect to power all USB ports. 5 Volts at 1 Amp per port would mean the entire hub would consume 35W which is over the 24W limit.

The hub presentation makes a good first impression. We first get the technical details:

Rosonway 7-Port USB 3.0 Hub 4

We will then find the hub behind it fully protected:

Rosonway 7-Port USB 3.0 Hub 5

Under it, we find the USB cable and power supply:

Rosonway 7-Port USB 3.0 Hub 6

The power supply indeed is a 12V/2A adapter, so we get 24W in total:

Rosonway 7-Port USB 3.0 Hub 7

Let’s take a closer look at the USB Hub:

This hub uses a USB Type B 3.0 connector. The power supply is of barrel type, like those of the hard disk drives. Each port has an LED on the other side of the hub.

This is the entire content we get:

Rosonway 7-Port USB 3.0 Hub 10

Because of the low power output, I’m using this hub with USB devices that are not USB-Powered. Here we can see how the hub look with some devices connected to it:

Rosonway 7-Port USB 3.0 Hub 11

It has to be noted that this hub also works without connecting the power adapter, which is great if we intend to use it with already-powered USB devices. I have not experienced any issues as of yet.

You can buy this USB hub on Amazon at the following link:

The Sabrent 10-Port USB 3.0 Hub

The Sabrent 10-Port USB 3.0 Hub

Hi everyone,

Today, we will be seeing one of the new USB hubs I received. This is the Sabrent 10-Port USB 3.0 Hub:

This hub comes with a 60-Watt Power Supply which means this mighty hub allows us to use USB-Powered devices without struggles. It also has a power switch to allow us to turn a port on or off at any time. Finally, because it has 10 USB 3.0 ports, we can connect up to 10 USB devices to it.

We will find the USB Hub inside the box:

Sabrent 10-Port USB 3.0 Hub 5

After taking out the hub, we find a box that contains the cables:

At the very end, we have the user manual and a warranty card:

Sabrent 10-Port USB 3.0 Hub 7

Let’s take a closer look at the USB Hub:

The main USB port is a Type-B 3.0 port. The DC power connector is of barrel type and the power supply must supply 12V. We can see that each port has an LED in the middle, between the USB ports and the power button.

The Power Supply is effectively able to supply up to 60W, as it can output up to 5 Amps at 12 Volts.

Sabrent 10-Port USB 3.0 Hub 13

The Power Supply is also a 2-piece item, A Nema 1-15P to IEC C7 cable is needed to connect to the power supply. This cable is widely used in other products, like in some inkjet printers. The USB cable is a 3.0 Type A to Type B cable.

Here we have the entire product content:

Sabrent 10-Port USB 3.0 Hub 14

Lastly, I’ve put it to work, using 6 ports out of the 10:

Sabrent 10-Port USB 3.0 Hub 15

So far it’s been working reliably. I was using a USB 2.0 hub but was having some Semaphore Timeout issues, which simply doesn’t happen with this hub. The USB-powered devices are also all being powered by the hub and haven’t experienced yet an issue with neither of them. The 6 devices are all slim Optical Drives. We’ll see those at a later post.

You can buy the Sabrent 10-port USB Hub at Amazon in the following link:

2 UGREEN products: USB 3.0 6ft Extension Cable and a 4-Port USB 3.0 Hub

2 UGREEN products: USB 3.0 6ft Extension Cable and a 4-Port USB 3.0 Hub

Hi everyone,

Today, we will be seeing 2 UGREEN products. These are a USB 3.0 6ft Extension Cable and a 4-Port USB 3.0 Hub. These 2 products have been with me since last summer and they’ve been working great. These products are being used right now as a middle point between my PC and other USB Hubs that are connected to the 4-port hub. We will be seeing those other hubs on future posts.

The USB Extension cable is very basic and basically comes in a simple bag. This is the 6-feet version:

Both sides of it are Gold-plated.

The USB Hub comes on a very simple packaging. Points to UGREEN for a sustainable package!

Opening it reveals the USB Hub with both parts protected:

The hub itself is made of plastic. It also has a Micro USB port to supply additional power if we plan to use it with USB-Powered devices like portable hard disk drives or optical drives. The cable is a bit long too. However, since in my case my PC is on one side and the stuff I will connect will be on another side, the USB extension cable is also required. This hub appears to use a GL3510 chip from Genesys Logic, Inc.

UGreen 4-Port USB 3.0 Hub 7

In the end, my setup looks like this:

In the next posts, we will see the other 2 hubs that finally got delivered to me after an unexpected delay

You can get these 2 items in the following links:

.

Calibrating the LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray drive

Calibrating the LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray drive

Hi everyone,

I’m now at my 3rd LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray drive. The first one had its Blu-Ray laser die and the second one began having issues reading Blu-Ray discs. The 3rd one reads them faster. But what if I could have fixed the 2nd drive? That’s what we will be looking here.

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive Front

This drive is not one of my favorite writers. It is not a good writer. Most of the discs I burn with it ends up having the so called “donut rings”, and some double layer discs are not burned correctly. However, this drive is a good reader and is why I use it, that is, when it works.

When I got my 3rd drive, I opened it along with the 2nd drive, and tried to see the distance between a disc and the laser:

My 2nd drive had the laser more close to the disc itself, which may be why it was failing to read discs or take some time to read it. It was also making the grinding noises this drive is known to do.

The drive motor has 2 screws on the side which can lower or increase the distance between the disc and the laser, so by adjusting it, I was able to get the 2nd drive to successfully read a disc on its first try without the noises:

LG WH14NS40 Laser Calibration 4

This is a trial and error process. I recommend having a disc inside and move the optical pickup unit all the way to the back so you can have a better look. The optical pickup unit and the disc should have a distance approximately to this:

LG WH14NS40 Laser Calibration 5

Keep in mind that if the disc is too close to the laser, it may scratch the disc and you may hear loud noises when it spins the disc, as it may be making contact with it. Just try to make it look like the above picture and it should proceed to work right away. Of course, each optical pickup unit has its own calibration data, but this seemed to work just fine on my drive and has not had any issues ever since.

Now, my 3rd drive is only used just as a backup, for when this 2nd drive starts having issues all over again. It has to be noted too that this 2nd drive has lasted way more than the 1st one did.

If it still doesn’t work, or you prefer to get another one, you can get it on Amazon at the following link:

Burning the PlexDisc CD-R discs on some Slim IDE drives

Burning the PlexDisc CD-R discs on some Slim IDE drives

Hi everyone,

Today, we’ll see how well my 3 optical IDE slim drives handles the PlexDisc 700MB CD-R discs. The units we’ll be testing against this disc are the Optiarc AD-7561A, Teach DW-224E-C, and the Toshiba SD-R6252.

Toshiba SD-R6252

Let’s start with the Toshiba SD-R6252. You may recall this drive failed to burn successfully the Verbatim CD-RW some time ago.

The drive detects the disc just fine and gives us a burning speed of up to 16x:

PlexDisc CD-R on TOSHIBA ODD-DVD SD-R6252

Starting to burn the disc in “Test Mode” appears to be fine:

But ultimately gives errors when burning it for real:

Interestingly, the drive either thinks the disc is blank afterwards or can’t recover the Table of Content (TOC):

Result: Failure

TEAC DW-224E-C

Because the disc is reported as “Empty” on the Toshiba drive, I’ll give it another go. There’s 2 things that can happen here: The first one is that it actually writes the data, and the second one is that it overwrites already written data, making a junk disc. This disc, however, visually looked like there was no data written in it, therefore, I assume the Toshiba laser is worn out and does not have the required power to actually write any data.

ImgBurn is unable to report writing speeds on the Teac drive, for some reason:

PlexDisc CD-R on TEAC DW-224E-C Failed Burned Toshiba Disc 2

However, it can be written at up to 24x in this drive. Test mode was successful in it:

And so was the real burn, but it never actually went up to 24x. Instead, it stayed at around 17x:

Result: Success!

Optiarc AD-7561A

ImgBurn reports a maximum burning speed of up to 24x:

PlexDisc CD-R on Optiarc AD-7561A

Test mode was successful:

And again, so was the real burn:

Result: Success!

Quality Scans

Next, we’ll scan the discs on a variety of drives to verify how well they were burned.

Disc burned in the TEAC DW-224E-C drive

Scanned on the LG WH16NS58:

PlexDisc CD-R on TEAC DW-224E-C Scanned on LG WH16NS58 Graph

Scanned on the LiteOn iHAS524 A:

Scanned on the LiteOn iHBS112 2:

Scanned on the Optiarc AD-7561A:

Scanned on the Pioneer BDR-2212. This drive has issues scanning CD-Rs:

Scanned on the Samsung SN-208AB. This drive always reports 0 C1 and C2 errors. It seems it can’t scan CD-Rs:

Disc burned in the Optiarc AD-7561A drive

Scanned on the LG WH16NS58:

PlexDisc CD-R on Optiarc AD7561A Scanned on LG WH16NS58 Graph

Scanned on the LiteOn iHAS524 A:

Scanned on the LiteOn iHBS112 2:

Scanned on the Optiarc AD-7561A:

Scanned on the Pioneer BDR-2212. This drive has issues scanning CD-Rs:

Scanned on the Samsung SN-208AB. This drive always reports 0 C1 and C2 errors. It seems it can’t scan CD-Rs:

Conclusion

Unfortunately, my Toshiba drive could not write them. However, the TEAC and Optiarc drives can successfully burn these discs flawlessly and provides good quality burns. I’d recommend this media for your data and music storage needs. It is very cheap and proved to work well on these old drives.

You can get these discs on Amazon at the following link:

Burning a Verbatim CD-RW on some old Slim IDE drives

Burning a Verbatim CD-RW on some old Slim IDE drives

Hi everyone,

In this post, We’ll be looking at some Slim IDE drives and how well they work with a Verbatim CD-RW disc. The drives we will be seeing are the Optiarc AD-7561A, Teach DW-224E-C, and the Toshiba SD-R6252.

I started first with the Toshiba SD-R6252 which is the drive with the oldest manufacturing date:

This drive was manufactured on July 2004. In my tests, it seems to read DVDs fine, but it fails to read CD-Rs, often with an “Unable to Recover TOC” message in ImgBurn. This drive supports CD and DVD writing.

The drive detects the disc and gives us burning speeds of 4x and 10x:

Verbatim CD-RW 12x

I initiated the burning process at 10x. It was able to erase the disc, but was surprised at the following message it gave me:

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 11

For some reason, it thinks the disc is 0 MB. However, pressing OK makes the disc burn successfully, or so I thought. Turns out this drive seem to ignore ImgBurn’s request to cycle the tray, and when the verification starts, it just freezes and starts making seek noises. This drive was also the noisiest drive. It seems the laser makes some noises when burning. Ultimately, I ejected the drive manually by disconnecting and reconnecting the USB cable. Then, ImgBurn somehow say the disc is “empty” yet it shows the old Table of Contents of the disc:

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 2

Maybe the drive couldn’t handle burning at 10x, so I restarted it at 4x:

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 4

But again, it froze at verification:

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 3

The disc seems to be lightly burned:

IDE Drive 4

The result is a failure for this drive. It isn’t able to correctly burn these discs. But maybe it’s the drive that’s somehow dead for CD’s, since it has issues reading most of them but reads fine CD-ROMs.

My next attempt is to use my TEAC DW-224E-C. Here, initially the drive is unable to read the disc as the Toshiba drive corrupted it.

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 5

It does not let me do anything as it doesn’t read it. I had to jump to the Optiarc drive which was successful at detecting the disc and allowing me to burn it.

This unit was successful at burning and verifying the disc.

IDE Drive 10

You can see that the lighter burned area is now darker.

I then placed the disc in the TEAC drive where it was able to read and verify it successfully too:

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 8

It also allows us to burn the disc again, so even when it was written, I performed an erase operation first, which blanked the disc:

IDE Drive 11

And then fired the burning process:

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 10

It was able to burn and verify it too.

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 9

The final disc played fine in my new Oakcastle Portable CD Player, which states it can read CD-RW.

Conclusion

From the above drives, only the Toshiba SD-R6252 failed to burn it. Both the TEAC and Optiarc drives were able to burn and verify it fine. Maybe the Toshiba drive is bad, as it fails to read CD-Rs correctly, sometimes unable to read the Table of Contents and sometimes failing to properly seek. However, that same drive is able to read DVDs without any issues, so maybe the CD laser is bad.

For the TEAC and Optiarc drives, the final result is a working, playable disc. The Optiarc drive is able to burn these discs at 4x and 10x. I didn’t test burning it at 4x. The TEAC drive does not show the supported burning speeds on ImgBurn like it did for the other 2 drives, but in reality, it burns it at the expected 10x.

The Oakcastle CD100 Portable CD Player with Bluetooth

The Oakcastle CD100 Portable CD Player with Bluetooth

Hi everyone,

Today, I’ll present you the Oakcastle CD100 Portable CD Player. Yes, a CD Player, and this one has Bluetooth in it. As you may know, nowadays people use streaming services to listen to music, which includes services with lossless audio quality. However, some people also prefer to buy CDs and listen to them, as some may argue that CDs offer better quality than lossless streaming services. Others buy them to collect them.

I’m one of the few who prefer to listen to Audio CDs, collecting them if I find it worth it after listening to them on streaming services. I do listen to them, but on my PC, as I didn’t have a CD player. My last one died lots of years ago, probably due to battery leakage. Thankfully, CD players are still being made and now comes with a rechargeable built-in battery, but the biggest new feature that’s coming to them is Bluetooth audio transmission. This is really important because, in a world that has shifted toward digital streaming and Bluetooth headphones, this means we can pair them to this CD player. It also means we can pair it to cars that no longer have an internal CD player.

Unboxing

I was suprised by the small, simple box.

Opening and starting to take out what’s inside, we first see the instruction manual and the CD player behind:

The box on the left contains all of the cables and the included in-ear headphone:

The CD player is very well protected with a foam container:

Let’s take a look at the CD optics:

First impressions

This CD player states that it can read Audio CD, CD-R, CD-RW, and discs containing MP3 files. I have tested it with some burned CD-Rs and can say that it works flawlessly. My discs are specially burned because I tend to create a LabelTag label on the data side. These discs are therefore considered multisession discs, as the label counts as a session on the disc structure. The CD player could read it without any issues at all.

Oakcastle CD100 15

The audio quality is very good, both when connected to the 3.5mm jack and when using Bluetooth.

Oakcastle CD100 13

The volume is very loud, so the IFI IEMatch comes in handy here, to reduce the volume by -24db. The Bluetooth sound is very clear. The difference I noticed is that the bass is a bit less present. It’s there, but it’s just not as dynamic as when using the headphone jack. The treble, on the other hand, seems to be the star of the show, along with crystal clear vocals. Maybe it’s the treble that may be shadowing the bass. Overall, everything sounds finer, even considering that it only transmits audio using the SBC codec.

Oakcastle CD100 12

The CD player charges via USB at a max of 1 amp. This basically allows you to use any USB charger you may have around. You can also use it while charging it.

Oakcastle CD100 16

Conclusion

My first impressions of this product are very positive. I’m pleased with the sound quality, both wired and on Bluetooth. It paired easily with my FiiO BTR5 and Hiby W3, both of which use a Qualcomm chipset. This means it should theoretically pair with headphones and receivers having one of their chips.

This CD player can also read MP3 files, and it worked really well on these discs too. It does take a second or two to load it, but works, and the audio quality is also very, very good. I just wish the next generation of players can read FLAC files directly too.

Regarding the battery life, I’ll play audio CDs non-stop to know how much time I can listen to music without having to recharge it.

UPDATE 3/26/2021: This CD Player can also play WMA files.

So far, I’m really impressed with it.

You can order this CD player on Amazon at the following link: