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SednaEarFit Xelastec Review

SednaEarFit Xelastec Review

Ever since I got my Hidizs MS4 IEM, I became a journey to try several ear tips, after I lost one of their “Bass” ear tips. This journey began with me trying some Chinese replacements tips, in particular, some called “Spiral ear tips”. They were good, but I still tried other tips, including the highly acclaimed Spinfits.

Unfortunately, I wasn’t pleased with the Spinfits, as I found it degraded the sound to my likes. It was until I found the AZLA SednaEarFitLight that I was really pleased with how the sound came from them.

SednaEarFit Xelastec 5

AZLA is known to make one of the best ear tips. Their SednaEarFit line improves both sound and comfort, but one of their issues has to do with getting the right fit, and the high price. However, once you find the correct size for you, you will be really pleased with how they sound.

AZLA recently released the SednaEarFit Xelastec, which is made of different material that adapts to your ear. This makes them fit great and will not, theoretically, fall.

SednaEarFit Xelastec 1

I found that one of the most important thing that affects the size is the nozzle size and diameter. The smaller the diameter, the more dull the sound will be, and the longer or shorter the nozzle length is, is how the sound frequency will get affected.

SednaEarFit Xelastec 2

On the Hidizs MS4, the shorter the nozzle length is, will produce more bass, great mids, and tame the treble. The longer the nozzle length is, there may be less bass, with more treble sparks, and the mids, well, fall in the middle or may get behind.

Once I tried the SednaEarFit Xelastec, they became my favorite ear tip. Here’s why:

Ease of use

Some ear tips have a hard time getting placed in the IEM nozzle, because of its diameter. This was the case when I got the Spinfit ear tip, as the diameter was small. With the SednaEarFit Xelastec, they just fit without having any struggles. This may be due to its adapting material.

Sound

The nozzle length of the Xelastec is shorter and just a bit smaller than their SednaEarFitLight. However, due to the material it’s made, the sound doesn’t get affected much. In fact, it does a great job to reproduce a great frequency response. The bass isn’t overwhelmed but is improved. The mids comes more forward but not too much. The treble is tamed with no sparks to it. The sound stage is very good to my likes, which is a forward sound with great instrument separation and energy.

Fit

This really depends on the tip size used. In my case, the best size is their ML (Medium-Large) size. They are very comfortable and fits very nice in my ears. I can use them for hours without getting itchy or without causing discomfort. They also do not fall. The material they are made will give you a sticky feeling, unlike silicone tips which depending on the one used, may cause you some itch and discomfort.

SednaEarFit Xelastec 7

The only downside is that due to them being kind of sticky, you may have to clean them often.

Price

Let’s be honest, these tips are not cheap, but they are really worth it. The main problem you’ll probably face is spending money to test the different tip sizes. I used to be a medium size when it comes to tips, but for the AZLA tips, the best ones are their Medium-Large. Fortunately, you can get various tip sizes but at a premium.

Personally, I got the pack that comes with medium, medium-large, and large tips, just to see if the medium-large would still fit or I needed to go down to the medium tips. The large ones are large indeed.

SednaEarFit Xelastec 3

So, for starters, you may want to start here. At a price of $28.00, each tip size comes at $9.33 approximately.

Conclusion

I can recommend these tips if you’re looking for comfort without compromising the sound. It may even improve it depending on which tips you are using. Remember that not all tips will produce the same sound with every IEM, so your mileage will vary here, but if you, like me, own the Hidizs MS4 IEM, I can recommend them. AZLA makes one of the most amazing and high quality ear tips I’ve ever used.

You can get these tips on Amazon here:

Individual sizes:

Comparison of the sound of the different Hiby R3 models

Comparison of the sound of the different Hiby R3 models

Hi everyone,

Today, I want to talk to you about the different sound signatures of the different Hiby R3 models.

Hiby is a company that specializes in audio hardware and headphones. They have created Digital Audio Players, Bluetooth receivers, and headphones. They have also created a modified Android version for their Hiby R5 and R6 players while also having developed the HibyOS operating system that powers the Hiby R3. They also use a range of DACs in their products that ultimately gives them their signature sound.

Two years ago, Hiby launched the Hiby R3 player on Kickstarter. This particular model used an ES9028Q2M DAC. It also offered a lot of great features for a price of just $189 at that time. Then, in the last months of the last year, Hiby launched the Hiby R3 Pro, changing the DAC to not one, but 2 Cirrus Logic CS43131. Finally, a few months ago, Hiby launched the new Hiby R3 Pro Saber which went back to using ESS DACs. This time, powered by two ES9218p DACs.

These players each have their advantages in the sound department, but none of them sounds the same. This is why I’ll be giving my thoughts on this.

Hiby R3

The original Hiby R3 is musical in the mids. The highs are not bright and the bass is not overwelmed. The sound is neither warm or bright, but rather neutral. This is why it seems like the mids have a better presentation.

Hiby R3 Pro

The Hiby R3 Pro changed the DAC to dual CS43131. Cirrus Logic DACs are warmer than those from ESS, which sounds more analytical and sometimes bright. Because of this, the bass and mids have a warmer tone, including making the vocals be warmer, The sound is also a bit more open due to the two DACs.

Hiby R3 Pro Saber

The Hiby R3 Pro Saber went back to the ESS DACs, particularly, the ES9218p. These DACs sound different depending on their implementation. On the Hiby R3 Pro Saber, the sound is more analytical, airy, and more open. The hights are bright but not to the point where they will cause hearing fatigue. I rather like the sound this way because it makes the highs be more detailed. The voices have a lot more air and are more forward and clearer than on the R3 Pro, which was warmer.

Below, you’ll find a video I recorded talking about these different models and their sound signature:

Which DAP is your favorite? Let me know in the comments.

The Avantree DG80 USB Bluetooth Audio Transmitter

The Avantree DG80 USB Bluetooth Audio Transmitter

Hi everyone,

Today, I’ll show you the Avantree DG80 Bluetooth USB Audio Transmitter:

Avantree DG80 - 1

This is a Bluetooth adapter that works as a PC audio card. It transmits audio via Bluetooth using the SBC, FastStream, aptX, or aptX Low Latency codec, depending on which codecc your headphone or adapter supports. Having the aptX codec provides us with a better audio experience.

The aptX Low Latency codec allows us to watch movies and videos without any audio delay. Most Bluetooth receivers today support this codec and having a transmitter with it makes us take advantage of this.

Avantree DG80 - 2

Unboxing

The DG80 packaging is small and simple.

Avantree DG80 - 3

We can see the adapter along with its manual and documentation behind.

We can see the transmitter is really small.

Finally, we have the included documentation.

Avantree DG80 - 9

Package content:

Avantree DG80 - 10

Using the transmitter

Using this transmitter is as simple as plugging it into a USB port and going into pairing mode.

Avantree DG80 - 11

We can see Windows detects it as Avantree DG80.

Avantree DG80 Settings 2

The transmitter has a bit depth and sample rate of 16bit/48khz, which is common with these adapters.

Avantree DG80 Settings 3

I paired it with my Fiio BTR5 and we can see it is using the aptX Low Latency codec.

Avantree DG80 - 12

Here’s a video of the pairing process of the adapter:

Audio Quality

Becuase this transmitter uses a Qualcomm chipset, the sound quality is realy great, thanks to its support of the aptX and aptX Low Latency codecs.

Signal strength

Avantree claims the adapter will work up to 30 meters or 100 feet. This may be true unless there are some obstacles in the way. In my tests with the Whooshi adapter, known to have signal issues, I was able to listen to music while I was in the same room. However, going away I could hear the audio getting cut. If you’re looking for the best signal range, the Avantree DG60 is a better choice.

Conclusion

If you still do not have a USB Bluetooth audio transmitter, the Avantree DG80 is a good start. It’s small, portable, and cheap. It also supports the aptX and aptX Low Latency codecs to provide excellent audio quality.

Opus GUI v1.16 released

Opus GUI v1.16 released

Hi everyone,

Today, I have released Opus GUI v1.16:

Opus GUI v1.16

This release adds a new text file called audioformats.txt. In this file, you can specify the file extensions that the GUI will process:

You can add new extensions as long as ffmpeg supports it, and they will be processed only if ffmpeg is present. Otherwise, only WAV files will be processed.

This version also has some bug fixes and improvements and updates the Google APIs to their latest version.

You can download this release on GitHub by clicking here.

Enjoy!

Audio MD5 Checker v0.5 released!

Audio MD5 Checker v0.5 released!

Hi everyone,

Today, I have released Audio MD5 Checker v0.5:

Audio MD5 Checker v0.5

This release adds a FrameMD5 check in addition to the usual MD5 check performed to the audio stream. This makes it possible to see where the mismatches are in a file.

Here’s how to use the new MD5 feature of it:

  • All files will be checked with both MD5 and FrameMD5.
  • When the file checking finishes, double click on either the source or comparison file. The whole FrameMD5 information will be shown.
  • To show only where the MD5 mismatches occur, double click on the number shown in the “Frame Mismatch” list.

You can download this release on GitHub by clicking here.

Enjoy!

MP3Packer GUI v1.0 released

MP3Packer GUI v1.0 released

Hi everyone,

Today, I have released MP3Packer GUI v1.0:

MP3Packer GUI v1.0
MP3Packer GUI v1.0

This new tool allows you to recompress your MP3 files to save additional space. It can process MP3 files encoded with VBR and CBR bitrates. In both cases, you can save a couble of bytes or kilobytes, depending on the file.

MP3Packer maintains the original file tags, meaning there is no metadata loss.

MP3Packer tries to recompress the file losslessly, meaning the audio should not be changed. However, it is recommended to test the audio streams with Audio MD5 Checker to make sure they are identical.

You can download this new tool on GitHub by clicking here.

You can also see the software source code here.

Enjoy!