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Category: Compact Disc

Burning the PlexDisc CD-R discs on some Slim IDE drives

Burning the PlexDisc CD-R discs on some Slim IDE drives

Hi everyone,

Today, we’ll see how well my 3 optical IDE slim drives handles the PlexDisc 700MB CD-R discs. The units we’ll be testing against this disc are the Optiarc AD-7561A, Teach DW-224E-C, and the Toshiba SD-R6252.

Toshiba SD-R6252

Let’s start with the Toshiba SD-R6252. You may recall this drive failed to burn successfully the Verbatim CD-RW some time ago.

The drive detects the disc just fine and gives us a burning speed of up to 16x:

PlexDisc CD-R on TOSHIBA ODD-DVD SD-R6252

Starting to burn the disc in “Test Mode” appears to be fine:

But ultimately gives errors when burning it for real:

Interestingly, the drive either thinks the disc is blank afterwards or can’t recover the Table of Content (TOC):

Result: Failure

TEAC DW-224E-C

Because the disc is reported as “Empty” on the Toshiba drive, I’ll give it another go. There’s 2 things that can happen here: The first one is that it actually writes the data, and the second one is that it overwrites already written data, making a junk disc. This disc, however, visually looked like there was no data written in it, therefore, I assume the Toshiba laser is worn out and does not have the required power to actually write any data.

ImgBurn is unable to report writing speeds on the Teac drive, for some reason:

PlexDisc CD-R on TEAC DW-224E-C Failed Burned Toshiba Disc 2

However, it can be written at up to 24x in this drive. Test mode was successful in it:

And so was the real burn, but it never actually went up to 24x. Instead, it stayed at around 17x:

Result: Success!

Optiarc AD-7561A

ImgBurn reports a maximum burning speed of up to 24x:

PlexDisc CD-R on Optiarc AD-7561A

Test mode was successful:

And again, so was the real burn:

Result: Success!

Quality Scans

Next, we’ll scan the discs on a variety of drives to verify how well they were burned.

Disc burned in the TEAC DW-224E-C drive

Scanned on the LG WH16NS58:

PlexDisc CD-R on TEAC DW-224E-C Scanned on LG WH16NS58 Graph

Scanned on the LiteOn iHAS524 A:

Scanned on the LiteOn iHBS112 2:

Scanned on the Optiarc AD-7561A:

Scanned on the Pioneer BDR-2212. This drive has issues scanning CD-Rs:

Scanned on the Samsung SN-208AB. This drive always reports 0 C1 and C2 errors. It seems it can’t scan CD-Rs:

Disc burned in the Optiarc AD-7561A drive

Scanned on the LG WH16NS58:

PlexDisc CD-R on Optiarc AD7561A Scanned on LG WH16NS58 Graph

Scanned on the LiteOn iHAS524 A:

Scanned on the LiteOn iHBS112 2:

Scanned on the Optiarc AD-7561A:

Scanned on the Pioneer BDR-2212. This drive has issues scanning CD-Rs:

Scanned on the Samsung SN-208AB. This drive always reports 0 C1 and C2 errors. It seems it can’t scan CD-Rs:

Conclusion

Unfortunately, my Toshiba drive could not write them. However, the TEAC and Optiarc drives can successfully burn these discs flawlessly and provides good quality burns. I’d recommend this media for your data and music storage needs. It is very cheap and proved to work well on these old drives.

You can get these discs on Amazon at the following link:

The Verbatim CD-RW 25pk

The Verbatim CD-RW 25pk

Hi everyone,

A few days ago, I wrote I was trying to burn a Verbatim CD-RW on some old IDE drives. Today, I’m showing you the pack of these discs I got last year, which is what I’m still using to this date.

These discs can be burned up to 12x. However, my drives can only burn them up to 10x. I don’t remember owning a drive that actually allowed me to burn at 12x. For some reason, they all can burn these at 10x.

The discs are top logo branded:

On the data side, it has a dark grey color:

Verbatim CD-RW 6

Once burned, it is a bit darker. Notice in the inner ring the light color and then it turns darker.

Verbatim CD-RW 7

The burned shade will depend on the burner used. In this particular case, the burned area is a bit lighter. Note that, however, the disc had previous data before, which is why the rest of it looks darker.

The discs are perfectly compatible on my Oakcastle Portable CD Player and this is how I’m testing them before finally moving the disc to a CD-R.

Verbatim CD-RW 8

Overall, I’m pleased with these discs.

You can get them on Amazon at the following link:

The Oakcastle CD100 Portable CD Player with Bluetooth

The Oakcastle CD100 Portable CD Player with Bluetooth

Hi everyone,

Today, I’ll present you the Oakcastle CD100 Portable CD Player. Yes, a CD Player, and this one has Bluetooth in it. As you may know, nowadays people use streaming services to listen to music, which includes services with lossless audio quality. However, some people also prefer to buy CDs and listen to them, as some may argue that CDs offer better quality than lossless streaming services. Others buy them to collect them.

I’m one of the few who prefer to listen to Audio CDs, collecting them if I find it worth it after listening to them on streaming services. I do listen to them, but on my PC, as I didn’t have a CD player. My last one died lots of years ago, probably due to battery leakage. Thankfully, CD players are still being made and now comes with a rechargeable built-in battery, but the biggest new feature that’s coming to them is Bluetooth audio transmission. This is really important because, in a world that has shifted toward digital streaming and Bluetooth headphones, this means we can pair them to this CD player. It also means we can pair it to cars that no longer have an internal CD player.

Unboxing

I was suprised by the small, simple box.

Opening and starting to take out what’s inside, we first see the instruction manual and the CD player behind:

The box on the left contains all of the cables and the included in-ear headphone:

The CD player is very well protected with a foam container:

Let’s take a look at the CD optics:

First impressions

This CD player states that it can read Audio CD, CD-R, CD-RW, and discs containing MP3 files. I have tested it with some burned CD-Rs and can say that it works flawlessly. My discs are specially burned because I tend to create a LabelTag label on the data side. These discs are therefore considered multisession discs, as the label counts as a session on the disc structure. The CD player could read it without any issues at all.

Oakcastle CD100 15

The audio quality is very good, both when connected to the 3.5mm jack and when using Bluetooth.

Oakcastle CD100 13

The volume is very loud, so the IFI IEMatch comes in handy here, to reduce the volume by -24db. The Bluetooth sound is very clear. The difference I noticed is that the bass is a bit less present. It’s there, but it’s just not as dynamic as when using the headphone jack. The treble, on the other hand, seems to be the star of the show, along with crystal clear vocals. Maybe it’s the treble that may be shadowing the bass. Overall, everything sounds finer, even considering that it only transmits audio using the SBC codec.

Oakcastle CD100 12

The CD player charges via USB at a max of 1 amp. This basically allows you to use any USB charger you may have around. You can also use it while charging it.

Oakcastle CD100 16

Conclusion

My first impressions of this product are very positive. I’m pleased with the sound quality, both wired and on Bluetooth. It paired easily with my FiiO BTR5 and Hiby W3, both of which use a Qualcomm chipset. This means it should theoretically pair with headphones and receivers having one of their chips.

This CD player can also read MP3 files, and it worked really well on these discs too. It does take a second or two to load it, but works, and the audio quality is also very, very good. I just wish the next generation of players can read FLAC files directly too.

Regarding the battery life, I’ll play audio CDs non-stop to know how much time I can listen to music without having to recharge it.

UPDATE 3/26/2021: This CD Player can also play WMA files.

So far, I’m really impressed with it.

You can order this CD player on Amazon at the following link: