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Unboxing New Pokémon Snap for the Nintendo Switch

Unboxing New Pokémon Snap for the Nintendo Switch

Hi everyone,

On Friday, I got the New Pokémon Snap game for the Nintendo Switch. This is the successor for the Nintendo 64 Pokémon Snap game. Here, we’ll see the box and its cart.

The game box contains graphics with several Pokémon.

New Pokemon Snap 3

Inside, we see a simpler graphics with the game cart.

Above are pictures of the game cart.

New Pokemon Snap 6

And this is how it looks on the Nintendo Switch Main Menu.

Have you got this game? I’ll be playing it in the following days.

You can get it on Amazon at the following link:

An armadillo crossing the street

An armadillo crossing the street

Hi everyone,

Today, I had the chance of taking photos of this armadillo that crossed the street o my front yard. He was successful and luckily, no cars were passing at the time. I hope you like them:

The photos were taken with the Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra with the firmware ending in AUB5. They were taken with a 15.4 Digital Zoom.

Pioneer BDR-2212 Teardown

Pioneer BDR-2212 Teardown

Hi everyone,

Today, we will be seeing a teardown of the Pioneer BDR-2212 Blu-Ray recorder. Like most PC Disc drives, a teardown is usually a very simple process.

First, let’s take a look at the drive itself:

Before attempting to open it, we must open the disc tray, so we’ll be able to remove the front faceplate:

Pioneer BDR-2212 Teardown 4

We will now flip the drive and remove each screw:

Pioneer BDR-2212 Teardown 5

And viola! We now have opened the drive:

Pioneer BDR-2212 Teardown 6

Its internals are very similar to most drives. You’ll find 2 small boards: One which holds the drive controller and EEPROM, and one that holds the tray loading mechanism:

Pioneer BDR-2212 Teardown 7

Here, you can take a closer look at both boards:

Now, lets take a front look:

Pioneer BDR-2212 Teardown 10

The internals are also very close to other Blu-Ray drives. In this case, the DVD and Blu-Ray optics are side-by-side, while other drives have this arranged in an up-down position. The LG drive, for example, have the Blu-Ray and DVD optics in an up-down configuration while the Panasonic drive also has a very similar side-by-side setup.

Pioneer BDR-2212 Teardown 11

On the left, we have the DVD optics while on the right, we have the Blu-Ray optics. The Optical Pickup Unit looks of very high quality. The motor is similar to other drives.

I hope this drive lasts a really long time. Internally, I would say each component looks very well designed, especially that Optical Pickup Unit. I’m still not sure whether to use this drive for CD and DVD burning, since that honor would go to my LiteOn iHAS524. It is, after all, capable of burning DVDs at up to 24x but burns most media at 20x when its OverSpeed setting is enabled. The Pioneer is able to burn up to 16x on DVD Single Layer media. I’m also not sure if the BDR-2212 is able to set the booktype on DVD+R and DVD+R DL discs, something that my LiteOn drive is able to do.

Another day, we’ll talk about how this drive handles BD-R DL media.

You can get this drive on Amazon at the following link:

Unboxing the Pioneer BDR-2212 Blu-Ray Burner

Unboxing the Pioneer BDR-2212 Blu-Ray Burner

Hi everyone,

This last week, I ordered the Pioneer BDR-2212. It is a Blu-Ray burner capable of burning up to 16x on BD-R, 14x on BD-R DL, 8x on BD-R TL (BDXL TL) and 6x on BD-R QL (BDXL QL). My reasons to get this drive are the following:

  1. Curiosity: Pioneer has been a maker of high quality drives, but comes with a high price tag. I already own an old LiteOn iHBS112 and LG WH14NS40 that I’ve crossflashed to the WH16NS60 and WH16NS58 (Which enables quality scanning).
  2. Problems burning and reading on the LG drive: The LG drive is probably the cheapest drive you can get now, but my first unit failed, so I ordered another one. The drive is also unreliable at reading and burning, sometimes making weird noises and burns have failed too.
  3. My Panasonic burner failed to burn CMCMAG-DI6 discs properly: The Panasonic UJ260 has been the drive I’ve been using to burn my discs and it has been working great, altough very slow sometimes, and can only burn BDXL at 2x. The drive works fine except for the CMCMAG-DI6 discs, which fails. We’ll talk about this on another post.

The Pioneer will be my main burner (assuming it can burn the discs fine) and reader from now on, and I’ll use the LG exclusively for 4K discs, since the BDR-2212 cannot read 4K Blu-Ray discs.

Let’s start with how the box look:

Opening the box, we can see the drive:

Pioneer BDR-2212 Unboxing 5

It came with a 100GB BDXL M-Disc:

Pioneer BDR-2212 Unboxing 6

Taking the drive off the box:

It also comes with the manual, Cyberlink suite and the mounting hardware:

Once in Windows, it is detected as a Pioneer BD-RW BDR-212M:

I’ll be testing this drive and see how well it performs. In my next post, I’ll perform a unit teardown.

You can get this drive on Amazon at the following link:

Unboxing Crash Bandicoot 4: It’s About Time for Nintendo Switch

Unboxing Crash Bandicoot 4: It’s About Time for Nintendo Switch

Hi everyone,

Today, we’ll look at the box for the Crash Bandicoot 4: It’s About Time game for the Nintendo Switch, which got released today. I had it preordered on Amazon.

The box is very colorful and the graphics looks of high quality. Let’s see the inside:

Crash Bandicoot: It's About Time for Nintendo Switch 3

The inside, however, is very simple. There’s no graphics inside. Instead, just Warranty information.

Let’s take a closer look at the game cart:

And here’s how it looks in the Nintendo Switch:

Crash Bandicoot: It's About Time for Nintendo Switch 6

While I have the N. Sane Trilogy, I haven’t finished it yet. At this point, all of these games are more for collection purposes and some day I’ll play them.

The Moon

The Moon

Hi everyone,

Today, I’m sharing these 2 photos I took today, trying out the “space zoom” of the Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra. Hope you like them.

Photos taken with the Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra with firmware ending in AUAJ.

Photos of the Day: Birds Flying in the Sky

Photos of the Day: Birds Flying in the Sky

Hi everyone,

Today, as I was out picking up my mail, I noticed a lot of birds flying in the sky. I found this interesting, as they were all lined up and flying in the same direction, with more birds coming from behind, so I decided to take some photos of them. Hope you all like them!

Photos taken with a Samsung Galaxy S21 Ultra with firmware ending in AUAJ.

Woodpecker – June 2020

Woodpecker – June 2020

Hi everyone,

I’m in the process of organizing my photos and I came with these photos I took of a Woodpecker that visited my backyard back in June 2020. These birds are common in my area due to the abundance of trees.

Photos taken with the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra with firmware ending in ATE6.

My 2020 in Audio Gear

My 2020 in Audio Gear

Hi everyone,

Last year was a great one when it came to acquiring new Audio Gear. In this post, I’ll talk about my acquisitions with a bit of overview for each product.

Digital Audio Players

In 2020, I got the FiiO M5, the Shanling Q1, the Hiby R3 Pro Saber, and the Hidizs AP80 Pro. These 4 companies do great products, so I went ahead and ordered their newest products. I had the Shanling Q1 already preordered on Kickstarter.

FiiO M5

FiiO M5

The FiiO M5 is a hybrid DAP. I say it’s hybrid because it also has a Qualcomm Bluetooth chip inside that makes it work as a Bluetooth receiver and transmitter separately. While products like Hiby and Hidizs DAPs also have Bluetooth receive/transmit functions, these work entirely using their Ingenic X1000E CPU and their Bluetooth chip, while the FiiO M5 uses its CSR8675 chip for this purpose.

The sound quality of the M5 is musical, using an AKM AK4377 with Velvet Sound, which seems to focus on mid details. The only downside is that a USB DAC cannot be used when using it in Bluetooth receive mode, and that it does not supports Opus files.

Hiby R3 Pro Saber

Hiby R3 Pro Saber

The Hiby R3 Pro Saber is a derivative product from the Hiby R3 Pro. Its main difference is that it uses 2x ESS 9218p DACs as opposed to the dual Cirrus Logic DACs found in the Hiby R3 Pro. Hiby claims the R3 Pro Saber offers a more analytical sound, and I can describe the sound as being more airy and open than the R3 Pro. This has been my favorite DAP to this date.

Hidizs AP80 Pro

The Hidizs AP80 Pro is the successor of the original Hidizs AP80 (pictured on the left). Its main difference is that it now offers dual ESS 9218p DACS and the Hiby HBC3000 FPGA. These same DACs and FPGA are found in the Hiby R3 Pro Saber, but they sound completely different. I would describe the sound of the AP80 Pro as being more warmer, especially in the bass, while the sound of the Hiby R3 Pro Saber is more open and fuller. I think that the AP80 Pro would fit those who seek deep bass while the Hiby R3 Pro Saber fits those looking for a more musical and open sound.

Shanling Q1

Shanling Q1

The Shanling Q1 (Pictured in the bottom center) was launched in Kickstarter. This player didn’t had Wifi until a later update added it with the DLNA feature. It also uses an ESS 9218p, but sounds different than the Hiby R3 Pro Saber and Hidizs AP80 Pro. The sound seems to be centered around mids. It sounds good, but different at the same time. The only downside is that the headphone jack is right in the middle and it is slippery. The buttons are also sensitive, but otherwise it’s a good DAP.

DACs and Dongles

Moving to the DACs and Dongles category, last year I got the new Tempotec BHD, the IFI Hip-Dac, and an off-brand very cheap DAC that’s surprisingly good.

IFI Hip-Dac

IFI Hip-Dac

The IFI Hip-Dac is an affordable DAC with a Burr-Brown DAC. It also renders MQA. Its sound is warm. On the back, it has a USB-C port which is only for charging, while a USB-A Male port is used for data. I rarely use this DAC because of the weird ports and I’d rather prefer it having 2 USB-C ports rather than its USB-A port. On the good side, the analog volume potentiometer works great, but be careful with sensitive IEMs as the volume gets extremely loud!

Tempotec Sonata BHD

The Tempotec Sonata BHD can be considered a “successor” to the Tempotec Sonata HD Pro. This one has dual Cirrus Logic CS43131 and has a 2.5mm output. It also shares the independent volume controls as the HD Pro. On the downsides, this one doesn’t have a detachable cable, and like the HD Pro, it has few volume steps. On the good side, it shares the same sound signature as the Tempotec Sonata HD Pro and doesn’t get warm.

Geekuy USB DAC

Geekuy DAC

This one was a surprise find on Amazon. It is very cheap, considering it has an XMOS controller and an ESS DAC. It also features a 3.5mm output. For the price, I was surprised at how good it sounds. It also doesn’t generate heat, is USB Audio Class 2.0, and works great with the PC. However, it had compatibility issues with my DAPs.

Bluetooth receivers

In this category, I got the FiiO UTWS1 (My favorites!), the Shanling UP4, the Qudelix 5K, and the new TRN BT20S Pro.

FiiO UTWS1

FiiO UTWS1

The FiiO UTWS1 seems to be a rebranded TRN BT20S with a different button configuration and better volume control. Its advantages are a more functional button configuration that includes raising and lowering the volume. This is the most warm Bluetooth adapter I have, which would satisfy bass lovers.

Shanling UP4

Shanling UP4

The Shanling UP4 is yet another product using dual ESS 9218p DACs. It, again, sounds differently than other products with the ES9218p. This time, it is warmer yet musical at the same time. When compared to the similar FiiO BTR5, which also uses the same dual ES9218p DACs, the sound of that one is more analytical, working best for treble and more analytical detail retrieval, while the Shanling UP4 works best for concert-like music and to be immersed into the music experience. It has a volume knob and supports major Bluetooth formats, which is standard in this kind of products nowadays. It also supports USB DAC functionality up to 16bit/48khz due to it its Qualcomm CSR8675 SoC.

Qudelix 5K

Qudelix 5K

The Qudelix 5K is made by a team of people who, according to sources, are the same ones who did the original EarStudio ES100 Bluetooth adapter. The Quidelix 5K is unique in that it uses the newer Qualcomm QCC5124 SoC versus the usual CSR8675 that others use. It also supports USB DAC mode up to 96Khz due to the improvements of the chip. It, again, uses dual ES9218p DACs, but sounds different due to the implementation used as well as their DSP processing. It sounds clean and not harsh. My only complaint is the button learning curve.

TRN BT20S Pro

TRN BT20S Pro

The TRN BT20S Pro is the successor of the TRN BT20S. They now include their own charging case which replaces the Micro USB port on the units. The hooks are also replaceable shall they go bad or you’d like to switch from 2-pin to MMCX. Unfortunately, it doesn’t play well with my phone as the volume is too loud. They also still have some hissing noise that’s also noticeable in their previous versions.

Bluetooth transmitters

The only Bluetooth transmitter I purchased last year was the Avantree DG80.

The Avantree DG80 supports aptX Low Latency, as seen on the FiiO BTR5 on the right. It is a small dongle that transmits audio from a PC or other devices supporting USB Audio Class 1 products. I’ve been an Avantree customer for some time due to their excellent transmitter and receiver devices, and their excellent support.

Headphones

Last year, the only headphone acquired was the KZ ZAX.

KZ ZAX

The KZ ZAX uses 8 drivers per side, consisting of 1 dynamic driver and 7 Balanced Armatures. The sound profile is V-shaped. It sounds somewhat similar to the KZ ZS10 Pro, yet more refined and doesn’t have a metallic sound that the ZS10 Pro suffered from. The sound is clean too and I sometimes listen to this over the Hidizs MS4, which are the ones I use the most. They retrieve a lot of detail in the music despite their V-shaped signature. On the downside, they do not isolate sound as well.

Headphone tips

Late in 2019, I ordered the NiceHCK Spiral tips, which I received early in 2020. Later in the year I ordered some tips from AZLA.

NiceHCK Spiral Tips

NiceHCK Spiral Tips

The NiceHCK Spiral tips have a spiral form in them. I ordered them after comparing them to other tips and making the nozzle close to the ears. The sound isolation is very good and improves bass in most cases.

AZLA SednaEarFitLight

AZLA SednaEarFitLight

I brought these tips accidentally, because it resembled the bass tips of the Hidizs MS4. Turns out the nozzle stays far from the ear, but they did improve the sound stage.

AZLA SednaEarFit Xelastec

Made from a different material than silicone, these have a sticky feeling. I wrote a more detailed review of these that you can find here.


And that was my 2020 in music gear. In my next post, I’ll talk about my acquisitions for 2021 that I will be reviewing as I receive them.

I haven’t received most of the products above, so keep looking forward to my reviews over the year too along with my new 2021 gear!