Upgrading the Lenovo Y720 RAM to 64GB

Upgrading the Lenovo Y720 RAM to 64GB

Hi everyone,

I’ve recently upgraded my Lenovo Y720 RAM to 64GB. This laptop came with 16GB initially, but it’s very easy to upgrade it.

Lenovo Y720 16GB RAM

I was browsing Amazon and found that the Samsung 32GB DDR4 SODIMM modules were the cheapest available, so I went ahead and ordered 2 of them.

Upgrading it was as easy as removing the back cover:

Lenovo Y720 motherboard with 16GB RAM

We can see the 2x 8GB RAM modules installed in the laptop here:

Samsung 8GB x2 RAM Modules in motherboard

And here they are removed:

Samsung 8GB x2 RAM Modules

The part number is M471A1K43CB1-CRC.

We will be replacing them with 2x 32GB Samsung DDR4 SODIMM modules with part number M471A4G43MB1-CTD:

Samsung 32GB x2 RAM Modules

Here we insert them in the laptop:

Samsung 32GB x2 RAM Modules in motherboard

A vew of the laptop’s motherboard with the new RAM modules:

Lenovo Y720 motherboard with 64GB RAM

And it booted!

Lenovo Y720 64GB RAM

Here’s the Task Manager reporting the 64GB of RAM:

Samsung 64GB RAM Lenovo Y720 1

In CPU-Z:

Samsung 64GB RAM Lenovo Y720 2

While the RAM should go up to 2666Mhz, the laptop’s CPU only supports it up to 2400Mhz. It also seems that CPU-Z could not read the RAM details, as the SPD tab is empty:

The most important thing is that now my laptop has 64GB of RAM which will be plenty for a very long time.

The LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray Writer

The LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray Writer

Hi everyone,

On Saturday, I received the LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray Writer Drive. This is my 3rd Blu-Ray writer and it will replace my LiteOn iHBS112 which was causing several bad burns. The other drive is the Panasonic UJ-260, which is a slim drive that burns discs successfully.

This drive is one of the cheapest Blu-Ray XL writers available on Amazon. It is also able to read and burn CDs and DVDs.

Here, we will see the drive unboxed and teared down.

Unboxing

The drive came in this simple box:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Box

There’s no branding. Just a box with the part number printed on a label.

Opening the box we see the drive:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Box Opened

Just the drive. No cables or software are included.

The drive is protected in bubble wrap:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive in bubble wrap

Also also comes inside a plastic bag:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive in Plastic Bag
LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive in Plastic Bag (Front)

Taking it off we see the drive itself:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive Front

Now, let’s take a look at the top, where we will find some useful information:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive Top

The drive is the WH14NS40, with SVC code NS50. It was manufactured on January 2020 and comes with firmware 1.04:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive Model, Firmware, and Manufacture Date

Finally, this is the drive with the tray opened:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive Tray Opened

Teardown

We will begin the teardown by removing the 4 screws on the bottom:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive Bottom

We can then remove the bottom cover:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive Bottom Opened

Let’s take a closer look at the drive chipset:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive Chipset
LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive Chipset

It is using a MediaTek MT1959HWDN chip.

Let’s now see the Eject Button, LED and Tray Motor board:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive Tray Motor Board

A look at the bottom tray mechanism:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive Internals

The internal tray loading mechanism and Optical Pickup Unit:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive Tray Internals

A closer look to the Optical Pickup Unit:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive Optical Pickup Unit

And finally, here’s how the drive looks in my Desktop PC:

LG 14X Blu-Ray Writer WH14NS40 Drive in the Desktop computer

Drive Summary

This Blu-Ray writer can be crossflashed to the WH16NS60 16x variant. In fact, that was the first thing I did.

The drive is identified as HL-DS-ST BD-RW WH16NS60.

Here is the drive capabilities according to ImgBurn:

So far, I was able to successfully burn a BD-R with media code RITEK-BR2-00 and a BD-R DL with media code RITEK-DR3-000. Both discs were burned with ImgBurn and verified successfully.

Look forward as I test Blu-Ray media with this drive!

The LiteOn iHAS524 C

The LiteOn iHAS524 C

Hi everyone,

In the past few days, I brought a LiteOn iHAS524 C DVD drive on eBay. This drive is quite rare and was being sold as used, but the unit seems to be in good conditions.

The reason to have this drive is due to its unique LabelTag feature. This allows you to create labels on the data side of a CD-R and DVD+/-R. It, of course, will consume space, but the advantage is that you don’t have to manually label the discs as long as there is enough storage. It can also be created as soon as the data is burned given you use Nero Express with the LabelTag software present.

Pocket CD 97m15s17f Ritek Media 3

I also currently have the LiteOn iHAS524 A, which had its optical pickup unit replaced with the one used in the B revision. They are compatible with the A units and have been working great. However, the C unit laser is NOT compatible with the A unit, and I guess the same is true with the B units.

Here, I’ll present you with a side by side comparison of the internals as well as its exterior photos.

LiteOn iHAS524 C External Photos

We start with the front of the drive:

LiteOn iHAS524 C Front

As is usual with DVD drives, you get to see the CD and DVD logos; and because this drive also features LabelTag, it has the logo in the front too.

Here is a closer look at the top:

LiteOn iHAS524 C Top

And the back:

LiteOn iHAS524 C Bottom

This C unit was manufactured on August 2012.

LiteOn iHAS524 A Exterior Photos

Now, let’s take a look at the exterior photos of the iHAS524 A. This drive has been with me since its release in 2010, so it doesn’t have the same condition as the iHAS524 C:

LiteOn iHAS524 A Front

Again, we see the CD, DVD, and LabelTag logos.

Here is the top:

LiteOn iHAS524 A Top

And the bottom of the drive:

LiteOn iHAS524 A Bottom

It has a missing screw which I lost some time ago when I replaced the drive optical pickup unit. This drive was manufactured on June 2010.

Side-by-side internals

Here, we will see the internals side by side. We will start with the top cover interior:

LiteOn iHAS524 Inside Top Cover

Now, a look at the drive’s inside:

LiteOn iHAS524 A and C Inside Side-by-side

Both drives looks almost identical, with a few diferences.

This is the iHAS524 B Optical Pickup Unit. The part number is SF-DS1XD. It is compatible with the LiteOn iHAS524 A and is the one it’s using.

LiteOn iHAS524 A Optical Pickup Unit (SF-DS1XD for B revision compatible with A revision)

And here’s the iHAS524 C Optical Pickup Unit:

LiteOn iHAS524 C Optical Pickup Unit (SF-DS1X1)

The part number is SF-DS1X1. It doesn’t have the small potentiometer on the lower left. Other than that, it looks almost the same.

LiteOn iHAS524 A and C Inside Bottom Side-by-side

The back also looks similar. The board from the A model is a bit bigger than the C model.

Here, we see both drives internals with the disc tray opened, giving us a better look at the reader mechanisms.

LiteOn iHAS524 A and C Inside Side-by-side With Disc Tray Opened

Unfortunately, the iHAS524 C Optical Pickup Unit is not compatible with the iHAS524 A. The drive refused to turn on, but it seems that what really happened was that there was a short circuit. This caused the ribbon cable to burn:

LiteOn iHAS524 A with the SF-DS1X1 Optical Pickup Unit
LiteOn iHAS524 A Burned Ribbon Cable

The iHAS524 A didn’t suffer any damage other than the burned ribbon cable. The SF-DS1X1 laser didn’t get damaged and the iHAS524C was able to work fine. After I made sure it worked, I placed its ribbon cable to the iHAS524 A and it started working with the SF-DS1XD OPU again. Phew!

Long story short, the SF-DS1X1 OPU is not compatible with the iHAS524 A. Use the SF-DS19L (The one that should be used in the A revision) or the SF-DS1XD (For B units, but also works with the A units).

This is the SF-DS19L Optical Pickup Unit which I replaced with the SF-DS1XD:

LiteOn iHAS524 A Optical Pickup Unit (SF-DS19L)

If you need one of these Optical Pickup Units, you can find them on AliExpress.

A Squirrel in my Back Yard (April 25, 2020)

A Squirrel in my Back Yard (April 25, 2020)

Hi everyone,

Today, I took the opportunity to take photos of this squirrel who was in my back yard today, testing the Samsung Galaxy S20 Ultra camera which has received some updates.

The Camera app version used is 10.0.03.2 and the Galaxy S20 Ultra firmware ends with ATD6. It is also the Snapdragon version.

The photos were taken in standard mode, in 4:3 ratio, with a zoom of 20x to 26x.

Click on a photo to see the larger version:

PAQ8PX ported to ARM processors

PAQ8PX ported to ARM processors

Hi everyone,

Over the past few days, I worked on porting the PAQ8PX compressor for ARM CPUs. Initially, it would not compile because it relied on some SSE instructions that are not available on ARM. This required porting some code to equivalent functions in this architecture. Once this was done, paq8px happily compiled and ran on the Snapdragon 845 and 865 CPU’s from my Samsung Galaxy S9+ and S20 Ultra smartphones:

paq8px_v187
paq8px_v186fix1 running on ARM

I tested it using the Termux app running Ubuntu from the AndroNix project.

The changes that were done to make it compile mostly involved adding some #elif directives. These were added below the initial #if directives that checked if we were compiling on i386 or x86_64 architectures. This #elif directive checks to see if the platform is ARM. The reason is that the header immintrin.h doesn’t exist on ARM. Instead, we need to include arm_neon.h and make the appropriate changes to convert the SSE/SSE2 instructions to NEON.

There were 2 main files that had SSE2/SSSE3 instructions that needed to be ported to NEON. In reality, these ports were not needed, as PAQ8PX contains code that doesn’t depends on the instruction set, but porting it makes the software take advantage of the CPU to its potential.

I started by doing the changed to the Mixer.hpp file, which had code for SSE2 and AVX2.

After porting the code, you can see 2 new functions along with some SSE2 to NEON helper functions were added:

SimdMixer.hpp and MixerFactory.cpp needed some additional else if and some additional conditions in order to support the NEON code:

SimdMixer.hpp

MixerFactory.cpp

The other file that contained SSSE3 instructions and needed to be ported to NEON was Bucket.hpp. I also did a mayor refactoring to let the code which SIMD to use according to the system spec or the user-specified SIMD to use:

Ported the SSSE3 code to AVX2:

The SSSE3 function is now called findSsse3:

And here we have the NEON code:

If no SIMD is specified or detected, the code will run findNone:

Finally, here’s the find function. It was extended to accept a second argument indicating which SIMD to use:

This change required adding this second argument to the corresponding lines of ContextMap.cpp and ContextMap2.cpp.

simd.hpp

This file required adding some #ifdef defines:

Then, I’m returning the value 11 if we have compiled paq8px on an ARM processor:

Finally, the paq8px.cpp file was updated to accept the NEON argument when using the -simd parameter.

And those were the main changes done to paq8px.

Currently, the latest version v187, which completes porting the SSE2/SSSE3 code to NEON, and fixes some bugs from previous versions.

You can follow paq8px development on the encode.su forum by clicking here.