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The Western Digital 14TB Easystore Hard Disk Drive

The Western Digital 14TB Easystore Hard Disk Drive

Hi everyone,

Today, I’ll show you the 14TB Western Digital Easystore Hard Disk Drive. This is an external hard drive sold at Best Buy in the United State, and sometimes they sell them at a special price.

The drive comes with a USB 3.0 conection. It has plenty of space to store our precious data as well as allowing us to store backup copies of it. These hard drives are filled with helium which makes them not get too hot when we are using them.

Unboxing

The box comes with a simple presentation, usual of hard disk drives boxes:

When we open it, we see the hard drive:

On the side, we see the cables and the manual:

Disk Benchmark

I connected the drive on Windows which recognized it as a 12.7TB drive. I then went ahead and ran a benchmark using the CystalDiskMark utility. It reported over 200MB+ read/write speed:

Here’s a video of the benchmark, altough I used another drive and it reported over 170MB+. The difference was that this other 14TB drive already had data in it:

Conclusion

With 12.7TB reported on windows, this drive allows us to store huge amounts of data and store backups. It is very fast and comes with typical Western Digital quality. I expect this drive to hold still for a lot of years, as my previous Western Digital drives are still operating excellent.

You can buy this hard disk drive on Best Buy here.

Shucking the Western Digital WD Elements 10TB External Hard Disk Drive

Shucking the Western Digital WD Elements 10TB External Hard Disk Drive

Hi everyone,

Today, I’ll show you the process of shucking the WD Elements 10TB External Hard Drive that I got the last 2 weeks.

WD Elements 10TB 1
The WD Elements 10TB HDD

We need to use a sharp object and slide it toward the edges to take off the clips from the case. Then, we’ll slide it to the right carefully:

WD Elements 10TB 2
Sliding the WD Elements 10TB HDD to the right

We’ll keep sliding it right until it gets out:

WD Elements 10TB 3
The WD Elements 10TB HDD

The drive inside my WD Elements is a WD100EMAZ:

WD Elements 10TB 4
WD Elements 10TB 4

Now, we need to take out the Hard Disk Drive from the case. This is easy, because it is attached to the case using some rubbers. We just need to carefully push the hard drive to get it out:

WD Elements 10TB 5
WD Elements 10TB 5

Now, we need to take out the SATA to USB controller screw:

WD Elements 10TB 7
WD Elements 10TB 7
WD Elements 10TB 8
WD Elements 10TB 8

And here we finally have the shucked drive:

WD Elements 10TB 9
WD Elements 10TB 9

This drive didn’t required any hack to install it in my desktop machine, unlike my 8TB drive which needed to be plugged with a MOLEX to SATA adapter so that it doesn’t receive the 3.3V. I plugged this 10TB drive directly using a SATA power cable from my EVGA 600W PSU:

WD Elements 10TB 10
WD Elements 10TB 10

Windows recognized the drive immediately:

Shucked WD 10TB EMAZ Drive in Windows Task Manager
Shucked WD 10TB EMAZ Drive in Windows Task Manager

10TB of space! (Actually, 9.1TB)

Shucked WD 10TB EMAZ Drive Properties
Shucked WD 10TB EMAZ Drive Properties

I ran CrystalDiskMark and this is the result:

Shucked WD 10TB EMAZ CrystalDiskMark benchmark
Shucked WD 10TB EMAZ CrystalDiskMark benchmark

It’s fast, and it’s working awesome in my machine.

With this I conclude this quick and simple post.

The Western Digital 10TB WD Elements External Hard Drive

The Western Digital 10TB WD Elements External Hard Drive

Hi everyone,

Last week, I got a new Western Digital 10TB Essentials External Drive, which was on sale at $160 on Amazon:

WD Elements 10TB 1
The WD Elements 10TB in the Amazon Box

The reason for getting this drive is that in today’s world, digital content is growing by a lot, and files are taking more space than ever. Video resolutions are growing and so are the quality of music, which takes a lot of space. Recent development on newer audio and video codecs may keep the audio file size small, but then, there’s those who store raw or compressed lossless media files, like FLACs or lossless H264/H265 videos.

I myself sometimes record my gameplay when I play Nintendo Switch games, and then I further encode this lossless recording to another HEVC using my NVidia GTX 1060 video card. This saves me between 2 to 5GB of file size. I’m also doing tests encoding my gameplay videos to the newer AV1 codec, that significantly reduces the video size while having a great quality at lower bitrates.

My 8TB drive will soon get full with so many content, encodings, data compression tests, server backups, and so on, hence my reason to add another drive (In reality, half of the disk is full). I found the $160 price very reasonable, considering my 8TB drive was also priced at $160 at Best Buy a few months ago.

When I purchased this drive on Amazon, it was actually not in stock, so I had to wait a few weeks, but it made it home. Here’s the drive box:

WD Elements 10TB 2
WD Elements External Hard Drive Box

Here are the sides:

And the back:

WD Elements 10TB 5
The WD Elements 10TB Back of the box

Opening the box, we find the drive well protected:

WD Elements 10TB 7
Opening the WD Elements 10TB box

In the side, we can see the Power Supply and USB 3.0 cable, along with the user manual:

WD Elements 10TB 8
WD Elements 10TB cables

Here’s the drive out of the box in its protected plastic pads:

WD Elements 10TB 9
WD Elements 10TB Hard Drive out of the box

Here, we can see the drive with the plastic wrap in place:

Here, we can see the drive USB 3.0 and power supply jack, and the power button:

WD Elements 10TB 13
WD Elements 10TB connectors

Here are the photos with the wrap taken off:

Here’s the power supply in its bag:

WD Elements 10TB 17
The WD Elements 10 TB power supply

And outside the bag:

WD Elements 10TB 18
The WD Elements Power Supply outside the bag

The Power Supply has a barrel-type plug:

WD Elements 10TB 19
The barrel plug

Next, we have the USB 3.0 cable:

WD Elements 10TB 20
The USB 3.0 Cable

Finally, we have the user manual:

WD Elements 10TB 21
The WD Elements manual

And that concludes this photo session. Later, I’ll do a post shucking this drive and also share the benchmark to you.

See ya next time!

Shucking a Western Digital 8TB My Book External Hard Disk Drive

Shucking a Western Digital 8TB My Book External Hard Disk Drive

Hi everyone,

In today’s post, I’ll be sharing some pictures of my shucked Western Digital 8TB My Book External Hard Disk Drive.

I got this hard drive as I’ve already had 2 other Seagate Hard Drives fail and needed another drive. I changed brands to Western Digital as I’ve been having a bad luck with Seagate lately.

Here’s the drive’s box:

wd-8tb-1

The drive outside of the box:

wd-8tb-2

The front of it:

wd-8tb-3

Here, I’ve taken the drive out of the main enclosure. It still needs to be removed from the internal enclosure:

wd-8tb-4

Finally, here’s removed:

wd-8tb-5

From what I’ve read, this is an HGST Helium-filled hard drive. Western Digital acquired HGST, so this is something that may be accurate. Also, another thing is that you can’t use a SATA power connector that supplies 3.3V. I’ve read reports of this, and they are actually true. It seems that if the drive senses the 3.3V, it disables the unit. This may be to prevent people from taking out the drive from the enclosure and use as an internal hard drive, as it’s actually cheaper to purchase an external drive, shuck it, and install as an internal disk.

The solution that I did was to use a standard MOLEX to SATA power adapter. These cables have 5V, 12V, and 2 ground cables. They do not pass 3.3V, making the drive usable inside the PC.

Here’s the drive installed:

wd-8tb-6

Hope you enjoyed today’s post!