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Comparison of the sound of the different Hiby R3 models

Comparison of the sound of the different Hiby R3 models

Hi everyone,

Today, I want to talk to you about the different sound signatures of the different Hiby R3 models.

Hiby is a company that specializes in audio hardware and headphones. They have created Digital Audio Players, Bluetooth receivers, and headphones. They have also created a modified Android version for their Hiby R5 and R6 players while also having developed the HibyOS operating system that powers the Hiby R3. They also use a range of DACs in their products that ultimately gives them their signature sound.

Two years ago, Hiby launched the Hiby R3 player on Kickstarter. This particular model used an ES9028Q2M DAC. It also offered a lot of great features for a price of just $189 at that time. Then, in the last months of the last year, Hiby launched the Hiby R3 Pro, changing the DAC to not one, but 2 Cirrus Logic CS43131. Finally, a few months ago, Hiby launched the new Hiby R3 Pro Saber which went back to using ESS DACs. This time, powered by two ES9218p DACs.

These players each have their advantages in the sound department, but none of them sounds the same. This is why I’ll be giving my thoughts on this.

Hiby R3

The original Hiby R3 is musical in the mids. The highs are not bright and the bass is not overwelmed. The sound is neither warm or bright, but rather neutral. This is why it seems like the mids have a better presentation.

Hiby R3 Pro

The Hiby R3 Pro changed the DAC to dual CS43131. Cirrus Logic DACs are warmer than those from ESS, which sounds more analytical and sometimes bright. Because of this, the bass and mids have a warmer tone, including making the vocals be warmer, The sound is also a bit more open due to the two DACs.

Hiby R3 Pro Saber

The Hiby R3 Pro Saber went back to the ESS DACs, particularly, the ES9218p. These DACs sound different depending on their implementation. On the Hiby R3 Pro Saber, the sound is more analytical, airy, and more open. The hights are bright but not to the point where they will cause hearing fatigue. I rather like the sound this way because it makes the highs be more detailed. The voices have a lot more air and are more forward and clearer than on the R3 Pro, which was warmer.

Below, you’ll find a video I recorded talking about these different models and their sound signature:

Which DAP is your favorite? Let me know in the comments.

Unboxing and testing the Yinyoo 2.5mm Balanced to 2-pin IEM In-Ear Monitor cable

Unboxing and testing the Yinyoo 2.5mm Balanced to 2-pin IEM In-Ear Monitor cable

Hi everyone,

Today, I’m sharing my Unboxing video of the Yinyoo 2.5mm Balanced to 2-pin IEM In-Ear Monitor cable. This is a 2.5mm balanced to 2-pin 0.78mm cable that is compatible with IEM’s like the KZ ZS7 which I have. In this video, I’ll also be testing the cable with my HiBy R3:

Do you have this cable or another one? What do you think of it? Let me know your cable recommendations below.

The Hidizs AP80 just got support for Sony’s LDAC bluetooth audio codec!

The Hidizs AP80 just got support for Sony’s LDAC bluetooth audio codec!

UPDATE 12/29/2018: Video here: https://moisescardona.me/hidizs-ap80-ldac-video

Hi everyone,

Today morning, it came to my attention that there was a new firmware update for the Hidizs AP80 Digital Audio player. I downloaded and installed it, and surprise! We have LDAC support now! This means that it can be used as an LDAC bluetooth receiver and should also work as a transmitted, altough I haven’t tested this mode yet.

To test the Hidizs AP80 LDAC functionality, I tried using my phone but for some reason it doesn’t work on either the HiBy R3 nor on the AP80. This may be a bug on the Samsung Android Pie beta software, or some sort of incompatibility in HiBy OS. Since this didn’t worked, I then proceeded to use my HiBy R3 as a transmitter and the Hidizs AP80 as as receiver. I logged in into Tidal in the R3 and tested the LDAC codec. It worked! Not only it worked, but the Sample Rate was also adjusted accordingly, meaning that standard 44.1Khz Tidal tracks will be transmitted and received at that very same sample rate. I also tested playing back one of a few Tidal albums that the R3 seems to decode in MQA and the sample rate again was adjusted to 88.2Khz

Here, you can see the HiBy R3 streaming a standard album and transmitting it via LDAC to the Hidizs AP80:

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
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For my next test, I decided to plug in my R3 to my laptop and use Foobar2000 and Tidal in WASAPI mode. This makes the Hiby R3 a USB DAC -> Bluetooth transmitter. This also worked nicely:

 

 

 

 

 
 
 
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A post shared by Moises Cardona (@moisesmcardona) on

Conclusion

I now have the perfect LDAC transmitter and receiver. There’s little delay, but the sound quality is better than using the standard SBC codec. Also it’s worth noting that when I used the HiBy R3 as a USB DAC and LDAC bluetooth transmitter in WASAPI mode, the sample rate was adjusted not only in the R3 but also in the Hidizs AP80, meaning if I’m using a sample rate of 44.1Khz in the PC, the same sample rate will be used in the Hiby R3 and Hidizs AP80. This is very convenient because there will be no downsampling performed. Also, the fact that the Hidizs AP80 also supports bidirectional USB, I could attach another DAC or Amp like the Hidizs DH1000 and enjoy high quality bluetooth sound.

The UGREEN USB to Micro USB Y Cable

The UGREEN USB to Micro USB Y Cable

Hi everyone,

Today, I received the UGREEN USB to Micro USB Y cable and I’m going to show it to you and also my use of it.

The UGREEN USB to Micro USB Y cable is a USB cable that splits into 2, and yes, you can use it to connect 2 devices simultaneously and transfer data to them because the cable acts as a USB Hub. This is the cable:

UGREEN Y Cable 1
The UGREEN Y Cable

Taken out of the package:

UGREEN Y Cable 2
UGREEN Y Cable taken out of the package

Now, this is where I show you my usage of it. As you may know from an earlier post, I own a Hidizs DH1000 Digital-Analog Converter and Amp. This Amp that I have has a problem with charging, and that’s where this cable comes handy. The DH1000 has 2 USB ports, One is for data and the other is for charging. This cable is the perfect solution to keep it powered on while enjoying music.

Here’s a picture of the cable connected to the DAC/Amp turned off and charging:

UGREEN Y Cable 3
UGREEN Y Cable connected to the Hidizs DH1000

Now, it’s important to know that this cable consumes around 0.05 to 0.08A (amps), so keep that in mind. This is due to its integrated Hub.

With the Hidizs DH1000 turned on, it consumes around 0.20A:

UGREEN Y Cable 4
UGREEN Y Cable connected to the Hidizs DH1000 and turned on

It works wonderful!

Here it is connected directly to a USB port of my laptop:

UGREEN Y Cable 5
UGREEN Y Cable connected to my Lenovo Legion Y720 laptop and the Hidizs DH1000

And of course, it’s compatible with my Hiby R3. Notice the USB logo on the top left, meaning it has a USB DAC connected to it:

UGREEN Y Cable connected to the Hiby R3 and the Hidizs DH1000
UGREEN Y Cable connected to the Hiby R3 and the Hidizs DH1000

And there you have it. The cable does the purpose it’s meant to do. It’s working fine with my amp, and that’s a wonderful thing. However, when it’s connected to the Hiby R3, the DAP’s (Digital Audio Player, the R3) battery will discharge more quickly. Still, it’s a very nice cable for short listening sessions.

You can buy this cable on Amazon at the following link:

Hidizs DH1000 using a USB Meter to simulate a Y cable

Hidizs DH1000 using a USB Meter to simulate a Y cable

Hi everyone,

As you may have seen from my previous posts, I’ve been developing GUI’s for FLAC and Opus, which are 2 great audio formats. This, of course, means I listen to music, and to enjoy them, I use my Hidizs DH1000 USB DAC/Amp. The sound it produces is awesome, but I’ve been having issues lately due to it charging very slow.

Because the unit charges very slow, at just 0.09A according to my meter, I needed to figure out a way I can keep using my DH1000 without sending the unit back to China for replacement. Of course, this is easy, because the unit features 2 USB, you can just connect 2 MicroUSB cables and have the problem solved. This would send power to the unit while you enjoy music, but what if you only have one USB socket available? Yes, you can use a USB hub, but I don’t think it’s recommended to use one because it would have a Hub in the middle and not a direct connection to the DAC, and also you’ll have several cables around.

To do a simple test, I purchased the PortaPow USB Meter which features 2 USB-A ports. One is for charging only and the other allows data transfer and charge, so the connection I’m using is the data port to the DH1000 data port and the No Data + SmartCharge port to the DH1000 microUSB charge port:

Using the PortaPow to provide Data and Charging to the Hidizs DH1000

With the meter, I could see that the unit is working and it is also drawing power from the USB port, which is what I initially wanted.

I also tested this with my Hiby R3 as you can see below:

Using the PortaPow with the Hiby R3

The Voltage seems to be below 5V, but it’s working fine. The downside is that the R3 battery drains faster, but for short-term music listening, this is fine.

My next step is to find a good USB-A to Micro USB Y Cable that provides charging and data to keep using my DH1000 for as long as possible.

I hope you enjoyed this post and found it useful. I know there’s some of you that have the DH1000 Blue Light issue, and that’s why I also have the rubber band that came with my unit in the DH1000, because I also have that issue. But hey, at least the DH1000 is still working great!

See ya in my next post!