Browsed by
Category: Optical Media

Burning the PlexDisc CD-R discs on some Slim IDE drives

Burning the PlexDisc CD-R discs on some Slim IDE drives

Hi everyone,

Today, we’ll see how well my 3 optical IDE slim drives handles the PlexDisc 700MB CD-R discs. The units we’ll be testing against this disc are the Optiarc AD-7561A, Teach DW-224E-C, and the Toshiba SD-R6252.

Toshiba SD-R6252

Let’s start with the Toshiba SD-R6252. You may recall this drive failed to burn successfully the Verbatim CD-RW some time ago.

The drive detects the disc just fine and gives us a burning speed of up to 16x:

PlexDisc CD-R on TOSHIBA ODD-DVD SD-R6252

Starting to burn the disc in “Test Mode” appears to be fine:

But ultimately gives errors when burning it for real:

Interestingly, the drive either thinks the disc is blank afterwards or can’t recover the Table of Content (TOC):

Result: Failure

TEAC DW-224E-C

Because the disc is reported as “Empty” on the Toshiba drive, I’ll give it another go. There’s 2 things that can happen here: The first one is that it actually writes the data, and the second one is that it overwrites already written data, making a junk disc. This disc, however, visually looked like there was no data written in it, therefore, I assume the Toshiba laser is worn out and does not have the required power to actually write any data.

ImgBurn is unable to report writing speeds on the Teac drive, for some reason:

PlexDisc CD-R on TEAC DW-224E-C Failed Burned Toshiba Disc 2

However, it can be written at up to 24x in this drive. Test mode was successful in it:

And so was the real burn, but it never actually went up to 24x. Instead, it stayed at around 17x:

Result: Success!

Optiarc AD-7561A

ImgBurn reports a maximum burning speed of up to 24x:

PlexDisc CD-R on Optiarc AD-7561A

Test mode was successful:

And again, so was the real burn:

Result: Success!

Quality Scans

Next, we’ll scan the discs on a variety of drives to verify how well they were burned.

Disc burned in the TEAC DW-224E-C drive

Scanned on the LG WH16NS58:

PlexDisc CD-R on TEAC DW-224E-C Scanned on LG WH16NS58 Graph

Scanned on the LiteOn iHAS524 A:

Scanned on the LiteOn iHBS112 2:

Scanned on the Optiarc AD-7561A:

Scanned on the Pioneer BDR-2212. This drive has issues scanning CD-Rs:

Scanned on the Samsung SN-208AB. This drive always reports 0 C1 and C2 errors. It seems it can’t scan CD-Rs:

Disc burned in the Optiarc AD-7561A drive

Scanned on the LG WH16NS58:

PlexDisc CD-R on Optiarc AD7561A Scanned on LG WH16NS58 Graph

Scanned on the LiteOn iHAS524 A:

Scanned on the LiteOn iHBS112 2:

Scanned on the Optiarc AD-7561A:

Scanned on the Pioneer BDR-2212. This drive has issues scanning CD-Rs:

Scanned on the Samsung SN-208AB. This drive always reports 0 C1 and C2 errors. It seems it can’t scan CD-Rs:

Conclusion

Unfortunately, my Toshiba drive could not write them. However, the TEAC and Optiarc drives can successfully burn these discs flawlessly and provides good quality burns. I’d recommend this media for your data and music storage needs. It is very cheap and proved to work well on these old drives.

You can get these discs on Amazon at the following link:

The PlexDisc CD-R 100pk Spindle

The PlexDisc CD-R 100pk Spindle

Hi everyone,

Today, we’ll see the PlexDisc CD-R 100pk I got from Amazon some time ago:

These discs are manufactured by Optodisc Taiwan, and holds 700MB of data or 80 minutes of audio. They can be burned at up to 52x, altough nowadays most writers burn them at up to 48x.

The discs have a logo top:

Here is how a single disc looks:

It has a light green color on the data side. The discs seem to be well made. ImgBurn says the discs have a Daxon media code:

PlexDisc CD-R on Optiarc AD-7561A

In my next post, we’ll see how well my IDE Slim Optical Drives handles this media.

You can get these discs on Amazon at the following link:

The Verbatim CD-RW 25pk

The Verbatim CD-RW 25pk

Hi everyone,

A few days ago, I wrote I was trying to burn a Verbatim CD-RW on some old IDE drives. Today, I’m showing you the pack of these discs I got last year, which is what I’m still using to this date.

These discs can be burned up to 12x. However, my drives can only burn them up to 10x. I don’t remember owning a drive that actually allowed me to burn at 12x. For some reason, they all can burn these at 10x.

The discs are top logo branded:

On the data side, it has a dark grey color:

Verbatim CD-RW 6

Once burned, it is a bit darker. Notice in the inner ring the light color and then it turns darker.

Verbatim CD-RW 7

The burned shade will depend on the burner used. In this particular case, the burned area is a bit lighter. Note that, however, the disc had previous data before, which is why the rest of it looks darker.

The discs are perfectly compatible on my Oakcastle Portable CD Player and this is how I’m testing them before finally moving the disc to a CD-R.

Verbatim CD-RW 8

Overall, I’m pleased with these discs.

You can get them on Amazon at the following link:

Burning a Verbatim CD-RW on some old Slim IDE drives

Burning a Verbatim CD-RW on some old Slim IDE drives

Hi everyone,

In this post, We’ll be looking at some Slim IDE drives and how well they work with a Verbatim CD-RW disc. The drives we will be seeing are the Optiarc AD-7561A, Teach DW-224E-C, and the Toshiba SD-R6252.

I started first with the Toshiba SD-R6252 which is the drive with the oldest manufacturing date:

This drive was manufactured on July 2004. In my tests, it seems to read DVDs fine, but it fails to read CD-Rs, often with an “Unable to Recover TOC” message in ImgBurn. This drive supports CD and DVD writing.

The drive detects the disc and gives us burning speeds of 4x and 10x:

Verbatim CD-RW 12x

I initiated the burning process at 10x. It was able to erase the disc, but was surprised at the following message it gave me:

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 11

For some reason, it thinks the disc is 0 MB. However, pressing OK makes the disc burn successfully, or so I thought. Turns out this drive seem to ignore ImgBurn’s request to cycle the tray, and when the verification starts, it just freezes and starts making seek noises. This drive was also the noisiest drive. It seems the laser makes some noises when burning. Ultimately, I ejected the drive manually by disconnecting and reconnecting the USB cable. Then, ImgBurn somehow say the disc is “empty” yet it shows the old Table of Contents of the disc:

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 2

Maybe the drive couldn’t handle burning at 10x, so I restarted it at 4x:

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 4

But again, it froze at verification:

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 3

The disc seems to be lightly burned:

IDE Drive 4

The result is a failure for this drive. It isn’t able to correctly burn these discs. But maybe it’s the drive that’s somehow dead for CD’s, since it has issues reading most of them but reads fine CD-ROMs.

My next attempt is to use my TEAC DW-224E-C. Here, initially the drive is unable to read the disc as the Toshiba drive corrupted it.

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 5

It does not let me do anything as it doesn’t read it. I had to jump to the Optiarc drive which was successful at detecting the disc and allowing me to burn it.

This unit was successful at burning and verifying the disc.

IDE Drive 10

You can see that the lighter burned area is now darker.

I then placed the disc in the TEAC drive where it was able to read and verify it successfully too:

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 8

It also allows us to burn the disc again, so even when it was written, I performed an erase operation first, which blanked the disc:

IDE Drive 11

And then fired the burning process:

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 10

It was able to burn and verify it too.

Verbatim CD-RW 12x 9

The final disc played fine in my new Oakcastle Portable CD Player, which states it can read CD-RW.

Conclusion

From the above drives, only the Toshiba SD-R6252 failed to burn it. Both the TEAC and Optiarc drives were able to burn and verify it fine. Maybe the Toshiba drive is bad, as it fails to read CD-Rs correctly, sometimes unable to read the Table of Contents and sometimes failing to properly seek. However, that same drive is able to read DVDs without any issues, so maybe the CD laser is bad.

For the TEAC and Optiarc drives, the final result is a working, playable disc. The Optiarc drive is able to burn these discs at 4x and 10x. I didn’t test burning it at 4x. The TEAC drive does not show the supported burning speeds on ImgBurn like it did for the other 2 drives, but in reality, it burns it at the expected 10x.

Philips BD-R DL 50GB burned at 6x on Pioneer BDR-2212

Philips BD-R DL 50GB burned at 6x on Pioneer BDR-2212

Hi everyone,

In my last post of the Philips BD-R DL 50GB discs, I shared the quality scan of the discs burned at 8x on the Pioneer BDR-2212 drive. Here, I’m sharing the quality scans of these discs burned on the same drive at 6x.

Overall, it is a good burn. As we saw in the previous post, it seems the drive manages to burn the second layer better. The LG drive, however, seems to have some spikes at the end while the LiteOn drive had more spikes on the first layer. The discs were all readable on both drives.

The burning took about aproximately 30 minutes, meanwhile the 8x burns takes about 25 minutes.

Gigablock DVD+R DL 8x Blank Media

Gigablock DVD+R DL 8x Blank Media

Note: I had this post written since the summer, but somehow forgot to publish it. I apologize for my lateness on publishing it.


Hi everyone,

Today, I’ll show you the 50-pack Gigablock DVD+R DL media I brought on Amazon. This 50-pack cost about half the price of a standard 100-pack DVD+R spindle. They are rated at 8x.

Gigablock DVD+R DL 1

The discs do not come in a standard spindle, so you have to be very careful when opening it.

Gigablock DVD+R DL 2

They have a branded surface:

Gigablock DVD+R DL 3

The recording surface has a dark purple color:

Gigablock DVD+R DL 4

Disc information

When the disk is loaded in ImgBurn on a LiteOn iHAS524 drive with OverSpeed turned on, it will detect them as having a speed of up to 16x:

The disc media ID from this batch is RICOHJPN-D01-67.

Unfortunately, burning these discs with either 12x or 16x will not work and will produce coasters. They will actually write at 4x but will fail the verification. This is why I recommend turning off OverSpeed and burning at the rated 8x speed.

Here’s the disk information with OverSpeed turned off:

Burning

The LiteOn iHAS524 was able to burn the discs successfully when burned at 8x. I burned them with HyperTuning, Online HyperTuning and Smart-Burn turned on. OverSpeed was turned off.

Interestingly, it seemed to have burned some discs using a CAV strategy while the rest were burned using a Z-CLV strategy.

CAV Strategy

The disc started burning at 5x but eventually reached 8x. Then it went backward:

Data verification was successful going up to 16x:

Z-CLV Strategy

The drive burned the discs starting at 4x, then going up to 6x, and finally up to 8x. It then did the same on the opposite direction:

Data verification was also successful having a maximum read speed of 16x:

Disc Quality Test

I used Nero DiscSpeed to perform quality tests on these discs. It seems that there is a problem around the layer break when the scan is performed at the maximum speed which is 16x:

However, when we reduced the speed to 8x, we got some decent results with no issues at the layer break:

Conclusion

With a price of just $19.99, I think this is a good media to backup data. A 100pk Single-layer DVD+R spindle cost somewhere between $20-$25 these days. While these media are Double Layer, you’re getting half the discs with almost double the capacity for around that same price.

When burning these discs, just don’t overspeed them. You’ll have coasters. Burn them at their rated speed of 8x and always verify the data. While none of my discs had issues verifying the discs burned at 8x, those burned at 12x and 16x did experienced issues. This is why you should disable overspeed and burn at 8x.

Philips BD-R DL 10pk

Philips BD-R DL 10pk

Hi everyone,

Today, we will be looking at the Philips BD-R DL White Inkjet Printable Blu-Ray Recordable media:

Philips BD-R DL 2

These discs were at a surprising price of just $9 dollars on Amazon, so I picked up 5 spindles of these.

Philips BD-R DL media

These discs holds up to 50GB and are rated to be burnt at up to 6x. Let’s take a look at the disc surface and label sides:

The discs have the Philips brand at the center of the disc. Also, we can see that the discs have some sort of tint on the data side. Hopefully, these will not affect the recordings. Or will it? Let’s find out how my burners handle these discs.

Burning on Panasonic UJ-260

My first attempt to burn these was with my old but trusted Panasonic UJ-260 drive. It has been successfully burning discs with media codes RITEK-BR2 (25GB), RITEK-DR3 (50GB), CMCMAG-BA5 (25GB) and VERBAT-IMk (100GB).

The disc was recognized as CMCMAG-DI6-000 and can be burnt at up to 4x in this drive:

CMCMAG-DI6 on U260

The disc was able to burn fine, but unfortunately failed verification. Let’s see the disc burned surface:

We can see that there are burning issues. The Panasonic UJ-260 writes double layer media in two zones. It starts at 2x, and then burns at 4x. On the 2nd layer, it goes from 4x to 2x. The red zones are when the drive spins down to 2x to burn the final parts of the disc.

Still, out of curiosity, somehow this disc was readable on the LG drive when I did a ScanDisc run on Nero DiscSpeed:

I burned another disc, this time at 2x. The burn again went fine, but the verification failed on the 2nd layer again.

Philips BD-R DL 7 Burned at 2x on Panasonic UJ260

The disc looks awful. You can see the rings in the recording surface. The scans also points this issue out:

Both drives agree that something is wrong at the end. The disc should technically be looking darker like the rings look, which would explain why the second layer was scanning properly until the rings started to appear.

Few days later, I burned another one at 4x using ImgBurn. The previous 2 were burned with Nero, but that shouldn’t had be an issue. This time, the disc burned and verified fine, but it still did rings at the disc surface:

Philips BD-R DL 7 Burned at 4x on Panasonic UJ260 Success

Scans looks better, but I wouldn’t trust the disc in its condition:

It’s still clear that the rings are affecting the burn.

Burning on the LiteOn iHBS112

I burned another disc on the LiteOn iHBS112. This drive is able to burn them at 4x and 6x:

CMCMAG-DI6-000 LiteOn iHBS112 ImgBurn

The disc burned and verified fine, but the drive produced rings on the disc surface too.

Philips BD-R DL 7 Burned at 6x on LiteOn iHBS112

This burner also burned this disc in 2 zones, one at 4x and the other at 6x. The first layer burned fine, but we can see it struggled on the 2nd layer at the 4x zone:

Regardless of the scans, the disc was completely readable.

LG WH16NS58

This drive is interesting in that if I burn with Nero, it fails immediately with “Write Error” and closes the disc, effectively not allowing us to retry burning anything since it changes the book type to BD-ROM somehow. I tried with ImgBurn at 6x and it managed to burn and verify the disc, but again, it came out with rings:

Philips BD-R DL 7 Burned at 6x on LG WH16NS58 Success

The drive did seem to produce a better burn except at the layer break. Also, the several rings do have an effect too:

I burned another disc, but this time it failed verifying:

Philips BD-R DL 7 Burned at 6x on LG WH16NS58 Failure

Scans:

It seems this time the issue is mostly at the layer break.

LG BP60NB10

I have this slim drive, and surprisingly, it did not produce any visible rings in the disc surface. It is also able to burn it at 6x:

Philips BD-R DL 7 Burned at 6x on LG BP60NB10

The disc was verified successful too. Let’s see how it performs at the graphs:

The LG seem to tolerate the disc better than the LiteOn. The first layer scanned fine. In both cases, the disc was completely readable without errors.

Pioneer BDR-2212 (BDR-212ULBK/BDR-212M)

I recently got this recorder to try burning these discs and see if it would offer a better burning experience. It is able to burn these discs at up to 8x on this drive.

I burned some discs with Nero 2017, which I haven’t upgraded since that version since every version is essentially just the same, and it burned the discs fine at 8x.

Philips BD-R DL 7 Burned at 8x on Pioneer BDR-2212

The disc surface looks very good. No rings are present either. However, when I first scanned the disc with my LG drive, it gave a really bad result:

CMCMAG-DI6-000 Burned with Pioneer Scanned with LG

So I re-ran the test again and got a way better result:

CMCMAG-DI6-000 Burned with Pioneer Scanned with LG retry

The LDC numbers may look high but the BIS numbers are almost within the standards. High, but the disc works fine across all my drives. The above scan was also performed at 8x. Below, we have the scans from my LG and LiteOn drive, from the same disc burned at 8x:

As we can see, the LG drive scanned the disc better than the LiteOn drive, but it was read without any issues there.

This drive seem to have better results when writing the 2nd layer, which is unexpected. Usually, the 1st layer is the one that gets burned the best. I did noticed that this drive seem to do a power calibration when switching layers, which can explain why the LDC/BIS numbers are low at that point. I think of this because the drive seem to slow down and pause when it reaches the layer break. The drive then proceeds to burn the disc as usual. My other drives would just keep burning immediately at this point.

Conclusion

These Philips BD-R DL use discs from CMC Magnetics with media code CMCMAG-DI6-000. These discs seem to have compatibility issues with some drives. In fact, go to Amazon and read the reviews and you’ll see some people are also having issues when burning these discs. Unfortunately, drive vendors that update their firmware are low. LG and Pioneer seem to keep their drives up to date, but the LG doesn’t seem to have the best luck burning them, as some discs may come fine and some may fail. The Pioneer seems to handle them the best and can even overspeed it to 8x. I think the investment on the drive paid off. Considering these discs spindles can be found cheap now, I think I’ll keep purchasing them for my archival needs.

You can buy these discs on Amazon here:

My 2nd Batch of Used BDXL discs

My 2nd Batch of Used BDXL discs

On the past days, I wrote about having purchased an used spindle of 10 Verbatim BDXL discs. I mentioned that I had also ordered the same item again, but the used condition mentioned was “Like New”. Today, we’ll see my experience this time, which may or may not surprise you.

The first thing is I received this item on an “Amazon Renewed” bag. The sticker is different from the “Amazon Inspected” one from my previous order:

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 1

Visually looking, we can see that the spindle looks fine itself:

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 2

Taking the spindle out of the packaging also doesn’t bring any serious alarm, except that the Verbatim label is broken:

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 3

Now, after opening it, is where I noticed something weird. Looking at the data side, it looks more “purple”:

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 6

Indeed, inserting this on one of my Blu-Ray drives indicates these are regular 25GB discs. It also has another media code unrelated to Verbatim itself: UMEBDR-016-000

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 8

The real Verbatim BDXL discs have a Media ID of VERBAT-IMk-000:

ImgBurn Panasonic UJ260 1

This is how a Verbatim BDXL disc should look:

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 7

And here they are side by side. See the difference?

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 5

The fact that the label was broken is also sketchy. Here are both spindles closed side by side:

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 4

My theory is that the previous owner kept the 100GB discs and exchanged them with regular 25GB printable discs and returned them. I went ahead and started the return process, stating this fact, and returned this item to my nearest UPS Store. At this time, all I can say is be careful when purchasing used discs. My previous experience was positive, but not this one.

The “Used” Verbatim BDXL discs

The “Used” Verbatim BDXL discs

Hi everyone,

Yesterday afternoon, I received the “Used – Good” Verbatim BDXL discs that I purchased last week. Today, we’ll see exactly what these discs really mean and if they are really used.

First, we see the item arrived on a bag. Visually inspecting it from the bag it seems the packaging itself looks good.

Verbatim BDXL Used-Good 1

Indeed, it all looks good, except it isn’t really wrapped like new items are, so the spindle was actually opened already.

Verbatim BDXL Used-Good 2

The spindle package looks so good that there are not even damages to it, which contradicts Amazon’s description of “Used – Good” items since it claimed that there were some damages.

Verbatim BDXL Used-Good 3

Taking a look at the discs itself, they also look good. There are no imperfections on it, which also contradicts their definition of the “Used – Good” condition.

Verbatim BDXL Used-Good 4

Even the data side looks fine. No disc have been burned either, so they are “brand new”.

Verbatim BDXL Used-Good 5

What I did notice, however, was a bit of dust in them, but that was it. No scratches or imperfections were found in them. As of now, I’m currently burning these discs, gently cleaning them before attempting to burn them to clear any dust they may have. Last night, the first 2 discs burned successfully. I’m burning my 3rd one as of this writing, and it’s going good so far, using my Panasonic UJ-260 ABPU-B.

For the price, this was a really good deal!

Get this item on Amazon below:

Buying Used BDXL discs. What to expect?

Buying Used BDXL discs. What to expect?

On the past few days, I ordered several quantities of BDXL discs to backup my recorded videos from the past years. These projects have varying sizes and some goes up to 1TB. This means I need several of these BDXL discs to back them up.

When looking at the BDXL media on Amazon, I noticed they can be purchased “Used” straight from the Amazon Warehouse seller. A spindle of 10 discs cost $41.88, while the Used condition was at $36.85.

It’s going to be interesting to see the definition of “Used” for these discs. The description says the packaging is damaged, and Amazon’s definition for “Used – Good” items say that they may be missing items. The order description talks about some “imperfections”, which will be interesting to see exactly what it means. While the price certainly is lower, maybe it may have 8 or 9 out of 10 discs, or maybe it’s just the packaging that’s bad and that’s it. In either way, tomorrow I’ll get to know for sure once it is delivered to me.

Today, before writing this post, I noticed Amazon Warehouse had the same product, this time listed as “Used – Like New”. The price was $39.79, which is $2 and some cents off the original new price. The description says that just the packaging is damaged, which is manageable if that’s the case. The most important part for me is that the discs are fine by themselves. This item will arrive on February 6 or sooner.

While I wait for these items to arrive, I’m compressing and splitting my projects into 23.3GB parts. This allows me to store 4 of those on a single BDXL disc. I’m burning these using my old Panasonic UJ-260 slim Blu-Ray writer since my LG WH14NS40 seems to have failures sometimes. I’ve wasted some discs already due to issues with that drive, while my Panasonic drive burns them flawlessly, although at just 2x, taking about 3 hours to burn and 2 hours to verify. While the burning time is long, the important part is that these discs are burning fine and can be read back correctly. I’m burning these discs with Nero 2017 using the SecurDisc compilation option.