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Burning a Verbatim BDXL 100GB Disc in the Panasonic UJ-260

Burning a Verbatim BDXL 100GB Disc in the Panasonic UJ-260

Hi everyone,

In this post, we will see how well a Verbatim BDXL 100GB disc is burned in the Panasonic UJ-260 drive.

This drive can burn these discs at just 2x:

ImgBurn Panasonic UJ260 1

I used ImgBurn to burn a disc to its maximum. It took 3 hours to get it burned, but it was successful:

The disc verification took 2 hours, as the drive switches between 2x and 4x while it reads. It was successful too:

The disc surface looks very smooth:

Verbatim BDXL Burned on Panasonic UJ-260

Quality Scan

The only drive that I currently have that is capable of scanning BDXL media is the LG WH16NS58. This drive reported an increase of numbers at the start of the 2nd layer and at the end of the 3rd one:

Verbatim VERBAT-IMk-000 Panasonic UJ-260 Disc 1 Quality Scan

I burned another disc in this drive too, and the LG scan was similar, but the numbers on those 2 spikes were about the half:

Verbatim VERBAT-IMk-000 Panasonic UJ-260 Disc 2 Quality Scan

The disc is completely readable regardless of those spikes and no slowdowns occurs either.

Conclusion

The Panasonic UJ-260 can successfully burn these discs. It is very slow, at just 2x, taking 3 hours to fully burn a disc. The verification is a bit faster, taking 2 hours. This also means that whenever we want to read back the entire disc in this drive, it will take 2 hours to do so.

The quality scans are questionable, as the discs could be read back properly without any issues. This is the only drive that can scan these discs.

If you don’t mind waiting 5 hours in total for the whole burning session, feel free to use this drive for your backup needs.

You can buy these discs and the drive on Amazon at the following links:

New CD-R and BD-RE Reviews and Unboxing Coming Soon!

New CD-R and BD-RE Reviews and Unboxing Coming Soon!

Hi everyone,

The past few days, I brought the following products:

New CD-R DA + BD-RE + BD-RE DL

I purchased the new PlexDisc CD-R Digital Audio discs that they mention are the best to store music. I’ll be reviewing it against the regular PlexDisc CD-R to see if they are really different, or are just the same but with the CD-R DA flag in them. Also, I’ll try them on my CD players to see if they do the initial seek faster.

The other products I got are Blu-Ray Rewritable media (BD-RE). A Spindle of SmartBuy Single Layer BD-RE spindle of 10 discs and a 10-pack Verbatim BD-RE DL media. These are my very first BD-RE media I got and will be testing them on my Panasonic UJ-260 writer and maybe on my Pioneer BDR-2212 drive.

Be also sure to be on the lookout on some other media I’ve yet to write that I currently have on the backlog. As of this moment, I’m still writing those articles with detailed images of the burning process and disc verification and quality scans. In the next few days, you’ll see those posts on my blog.

See you soon!

You can see and order the above items at the following links:

The Verbatim CD-RW 25pk

The Verbatim CD-RW 25pk

Hi everyone,

A few days ago, I wrote I was trying to burn a Verbatim CD-RW on some old IDE drives. Today, I’m showing you the pack of these discs I got last year, which is what I’m still using to this date.

These discs can be burned up to 12x. However, my drives can only burn them up to 10x. I don’t remember owning a drive that actually allowed me to burn at 12x. For some reason, they all can burn these at 10x.

The discs are top logo branded:

On the data side, it has a dark grey color:

Verbatim CD-RW 6

Once burned, it is a bit darker. Notice in the inner ring the light color and then it turns darker.

Verbatim CD-RW 7

The burned shade will depend on the burner used. In this particular case, the burned area is a bit lighter. Note that, however, the disc had previous data before, which is why the rest of it looks darker.

The discs are perfectly compatible on my Oakcastle Portable CD Player and this is how I’m testing them before finally moving the disc to a CD-R.

Verbatim CD-RW 8

Overall, I’m pleased with these discs.

You can get them on Amazon at the following link:

The HP BD-R DL 50GB Blu-Ray Discs

The HP BD-R DL 50GB Blu-Ray Discs

Hi everyone,

Early this week, I ordered more Double Layer Blu-Ray discs. Unfortunately, the Philips 10pk BD-R DLs that were at $9 each were out of stock, so I had 2 options, both listed at $11 dollars:

  • Philips BD-R DL 10pk – Logo surface
  • HP BD-R DL 10pk – Logo surface

I decided to go with the HP ones since I’ve already tested the Philips BD-R DL 10pk printable discs, and maybe the Logo surface ones were the same CMC Magnetics discs. With the HP ones, I have the opportunity to review these and see if they are the same or different than the Philips discs. Because the Verbatim 100GB discs are still very high on price and seem to be low on stock, I need to get more BD-R DLs than usual. This is why I ordered 5 of these packs again.

Basically, last time I wasted a full 10pk of the Philips discs doing tests, until realizing that the Pioneer BDR-2212 drive was the one that handled them best. Will the same happen here again? We’ll find out.

The disc packaging is very similar to the Philips discs, except that these spindles have a paper on the top as well as the branding on the sides. Both were made in Taiwan. They are also rated to be burned up at 6x, although the burning speeds available depends on the burner capabilities and firmware itself.

Opening it, we have the shiny top logo surface discs:

The discs does look to be very well made. The data surface also look very smooth too.

It also has a dark gold-colored look, as opposed to the dark grey color of the Philips discs. This is important because it may tell us that the manufacturer is different.

My first thought was to insert this into the Panasonic UJ-260, to see what it thinks of this disc.

VERBAT-IMf-000 Panasonic UJ-260

ImgBurn says these discs are made by Verbatim! The media code ID is VERBAT-IMf-000. The Panasonic UJ-260 can burn them at 2x and 6x. This is higher than the RITEK-DR3-000 and CMCMAG-DI6-000 discs, both of which could be burned up to 4x on this drive (Note that the CMCMAG-DI6-000 failed on this drive, but it could burn the RITEK-DR3-000 perfectly fine).

Given this, let’s try to burn a disc with Nero at 6x.

VERBAT-IMf-000 Panasonic UJ-260 Burning 6x on Nero

It did seem to start burning great, but unfortunately, the disc failed to burn with just a generic burning error:

VERBAT-IMf-000 Panasonic UJ-260 Burning 6x on Nero Failed

This is the first time the Panasonic fails on me while burning a disc. This is also unexpected, given that Verbatim discs should be the best of the best. Usually, this drive would burn a disc fine but may fail on the verification, like it did on the CMCMAG-DI6-000 discs. Maybe it couldn’t handle burning at 6x.

HP BD-R DL 10pk 6

As we can see, it failed at the first layer.

My next try was of course, on the Pioneer BDR-2212. It burned all of the Philips spindles flawlessly, altough on just one of the discs, it wrote a bad sector and this drive was able to read it back while the others failed on that sector. I discarded this disc, but the others wrote and verified just fine.

VERBAT-IMf-000 Pioneer BDR-2212

The Pioneer drive reports that this disc can be burned at up to 8x.

I fired up Nero and attempted to burn the disc at 8x. The CMCMAG-DI6-000 burned great at this speed and the verification went really well too. No speed slowdowns happened at all when reading them.

Nero was able to burn and verify this disc successfully. In fact, it also read back fine in my LiteOn iHBS112.

HP BD-R DL 10pk 7

The finished disc has a dark grey burned color. Here we can see it compared to a burned CMCMAG-DI6-000 disc:

HP BD-R DL 10pk 8

The CMCMAG-DI6-000 on the left has a darker burned color than the VERBAT-IMf-000 disc on the right.

Next are the usual quality scans. I really don’t pay attention to it, as it’s been proven that the drives can handle high amounts of LDC/BIS numbers and the only discs that failed on me were scratched or rotten ones. This happened some years ago, but none of the discs I’ve burned so far has given me issues.

Test results of an 8x burn

VERBAT-IMf-000 Burned with Pioneer BDR-2212 at 8x and scanned on LiteOn iHBS112 at 4x

The LiteOn iHBS112 seem to read the disc just great but reports high numbers on the first layer and a bit on the 2nd one before going back down to numbers that stays within the limits. Besides this result, the disc was completely readable.

VERBAT-IMf-000 Burned with Pioneer BDR-2212 at 8x and ScanDisc on LiteOn iHBS112

Now, let’s move on to scanning and verifying it on the LG WH16NS58:

VERBAT-IMf-000 Burned with Pioneer BDR-2212 at 8x and scanned on LG WH14NS58 at 4x

The LG drive stayed between the tolerance numbers except once it reached the 20GB mark, where it went up. It stabilized again on the 2nd layer at around 29GB and stayed within its limits. The disc once again was completely readable according to Nero DiscSpeed.

VERBAT-IMf-000 Burned with Pioneer BDR-2212 at 8x and ScanDisc on LG WH16NS58

Test results of a 6x burn

I burned a disc at 6x, which was successful too. The difference between a 6x and 8x burn is about 5 minutes.

Now, let’s see how it scanned:

The scan on the LiteOn drive is very similar to the 8x burn. On the LG drive, however, it seems the first layer was burned better. The start of the 2nd layer did present a spike but seem to correct itself. Remember that the Pioneer drive performs some calibration while burning. It usually does it at around 56% after starting to burn the second layer of a BD-R DL disc. The rest of the disc burned with good quality and no spikes.

Even with those spikes on both scans, the disc read fine on both instances.

Burning on the Panasonic UJ260 at 2x

I decided to give this drive another try, but this time burning at 2x. Surprisingly, it handled burning it and succeeded in the verification stage.

Testing on the LiteOn and LG drives looked way, way better too

We can see once again that the LG scanned it a bit better, but the difference between the LiteOn and LG is not so much. Overall, this looks way better than the Pioneer burns at 6x and 8x.

This is very good to know because before the Pioneer drive, I was always burning on the Panasonic drive. This means that the only media this drive cannot handle well is the CMCMAG-DI6-000, but it could be because of the tint of those discs that I mentioned on that review and may not be the case with other branded CMCMAG discs.

Conclusion

The discs from the batch I got are all Verbatim 6x media. They are burning reliably on the Pioneer drive and at 2x on the Panasonic drive. The LG and LiteOn drives can read back the data on all of the above cases regardless of the quality scans without any speed slowdown. I’d recommend this media because of how cheap it is, considering they seem to be Verbatim media but branded for HP.

You can order these discs on Amazon at the following link:

My 2nd Batch of Used BDXL discs

My 2nd Batch of Used BDXL discs

On the past days, I wrote about having purchased an used spindle of 10 Verbatim BDXL discs. I mentioned that I had also ordered the same item again, but the used condition mentioned was “Like New”. Today, we’ll see my experience this time, which may or may not surprise you.

The first thing is I received this item on an “Amazon Renewed” bag. The sticker is different from the “Amazon Inspected” one from my previous order:

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 1

Visually looking, we can see that the spindle looks fine itself:

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 2

Taking the spindle out of the packaging also doesn’t bring any serious alarm, except that the Verbatim label is broken:

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 3

Now, after opening it, is where I noticed something weird. Looking at the data side, it looks more “purple”:

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 6

Indeed, inserting this on one of my Blu-Ray drives indicates these are regular 25GB discs. It also has another media code unrelated to Verbatim itself: UMEBDR-016-000

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 8

The real Verbatim BDXL discs have a Media ID of VERBAT-IMk-000:

ImgBurn Panasonic UJ260 1

This is how a Verbatim BDXL disc should look:

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 7

And here they are side by side. See the difference?

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 5

The fact that the label was broken is also sketchy. Here are both spindles closed side by side:

"Verbatim" BDXL Used Discs 4

My theory is that the previous owner kept the 100GB discs and exchanged them with regular 25GB printable discs and returned them. I went ahead and started the return process, stating this fact, and returned this item to my nearest UPS Store. At this time, all I can say is be careful when purchasing used discs. My previous experience was positive, but not this one.

The “Used” Verbatim BDXL discs

The “Used” Verbatim BDXL discs

Hi everyone,

Yesterday afternoon, I received the “Used – Good” Verbatim BDXL discs that I purchased last week. Today, we’ll see exactly what these discs really mean and if they are really used.

First, we see the item arrived on a bag. Visually inspecting it from the bag it seems the packaging itself looks good.

Verbatim BDXL Used-Good 1

Indeed, it all looks good, except it isn’t really wrapped like new items are, so the spindle was actually opened already.

Verbatim BDXL Used-Good 2

The spindle package looks so good that there are not even damages to it, which contradicts Amazon’s description of “Used – Good” items since it claimed that there were some damages.

Verbatim BDXL Used-Good 3

Taking a look at the discs itself, they also look good. There are no imperfections on it, which also contradicts their definition of the “Used – Good” condition.

Verbatim BDXL Used-Good 4

Even the data side looks fine. No disc have been burned either, so they are “brand new”.

Verbatim BDXL Used-Good 5

What I did notice, however, was a bit of dust in them, but that was it. No scratches or imperfections were found in them. As of now, I’m currently burning these discs, gently cleaning them before attempting to burn them to clear any dust they may have. Last night, the first 2 discs burned successfully. I’m burning my 3rd one as of this writing, and it’s going good so far, using my Panasonic UJ-260 ABPU-B.

For the price, this was a really good deal!

Get this item on Amazon below:

Buying Used BDXL discs. What to expect?

Buying Used BDXL discs. What to expect?

On the past few days, I ordered several quantities of BDXL discs to backup my recorded videos from the past years. These projects have varying sizes and some goes up to 1TB. This means I need several of these BDXL discs to back them up.

When looking at the BDXL media on Amazon, I noticed they can be purchased “Used” straight from the Amazon Warehouse seller. A spindle of 10 discs cost $41.88, while the Used condition was at $36.85.

It’s going to be interesting to see the definition of “Used” for these discs. The description says the packaging is damaged, and Amazon’s definition for “Used – Good” items say that they may be missing items. The order description talks about some “imperfections”, which will be interesting to see exactly what it means. While the price certainly is lower, maybe it may have 8 or 9 out of 10 discs, or maybe it’s just the packaging that’s bad and that’s it. In either way, tomorrow I’ll get to know for sure once it is delivered to me.

Today, before writing this post, I noticed Amazon Warehouse had the same product, this time listed as “Used – Like New”. The price was $39.79, which is $2 and some cents off the original new price. The description says that just the packaging is damaged, which is manageable if that’s the case. The most important part for me is that the discs are fine by themselves. This item will arrive on February 6 or sooner.

While I wait for these items to arrive, I’m compressing and splitting my projects into 23.3GB parts. This allows me to store 4 of those on a single BDXL disc. I’m burning these using my old Panasonic UJ-260 slim Blu-Ray writer since my LG WH14NS40 seems to have failures sometimes. I’ve wasted some discs already due to issues with that drive, while my Panasonic drive burns them flawlessly, although at just 2x, taking about 3 hours to burn and 2 hours to verify. While the burning time is long, the important part is that these discs are burning fine and can be read back correctly. I’m burning these discs with Nero 2017 using the SecurDisc compilation option.

Verbatim 4x BDXL 100GB Blank Media

Verbatim 4x BDXL 100GB Blank Media

Hi everyone,

Yesterday, I received my very first BDXL media. These are way more expensive than BD-R and about twice the cost of BD-R DL media.

For my first BDXL recordable media, I decided to get the Verbatim 10-pack spindle. These seem to be one of the lowest-priced media when compared to 3-packs or 5-packs variants of other manufacturers.

These BDXL discs are rated at 4x, but my LG WH14NS40 crossflashed to the WH16NS60 firmware detects them as having a write speed of up to 8x.

The Media ID is VERBAT-IMk-000.

On my Panasonic UJ260, these have a maximum write speed of just 2x.

I added files to burn using ImgBurn, and made sure to use the most space possible. I then started the burning process on my WH14NS14 at the maximum supported speed of 8x.

It seems the drive use a Z-CLV (Zoned Constant Linear Velocity) strategy to burn these discs. The write pattern was as follows:

  • Layer 0: 4x -> 6x -> 8x
  • Layer 1: 8x -> 6x -> 4x
  • Layer 2: 4x -> 6x -> 8x

We can see the pattern below:

Some times, when the writing was at 4x, the drive would go down to 3.3x for about 1 second or 2:

The same happened when the drive was recording at 6x, going down to 5x for a second or 2:

The drive successfully burned this media, having an average speed of 5.7x:

Burning VERBAT-IMk-000 Average speed 5.7

Verification was slower than the writing itself, as it limited the read speed to 6x:

The verification was successful and no errors were reported:

The average read speed was 4.3x, slower than the 5.7x average when writing to it. It also seems that while ImgBurn set a read speed of up to 6x, the drive went all the way to 9x, according to the Maximum Verify Rate.

Here, we can see the written disc with its Z-CLV zones:

Conclusion

These discs seem to be compatible with the LG WH14NS40 Blu-Ray writer. They also burn at a faster 8x speed which is more than its rated speed of 4x. The drive was able to successfully burn them and read them. These discs, while expensive, allow us to write up to 100GB (about 93GB of actual storage) on a single medium. It would have taken us 4 25GB BD-R or 2 50GB BD-R DL media to write an equivalent amount of data.

Unfortunately, I don’t have any BDXL scanner I can use to test the quality, but the media can be read back on the LG drive as well as on my Panasonic UJ260. The latter seems to read the disc in Z-CLV too, but it was able to read the data back successfully too. It is just slower than the LG drive.

If we compare the price of having 10x 100GB Blu-Ray discs to owning a 1TB Hard Disk Drive, we can see that the BDXL media is a couple dollars more:

The BDXL media on eBay (It was at $53.15 at the time of puchase):

On Amazon. They seem to have lowered the price to $49.99 at the time I took this screenshot:

The price of 1TB Hard Disk Drives on Amazon:

Ultimately, it all would depend on your needs. Personally, I like to write data that will not be used frequently on optical media, while having frequently-changing data on the discs. I’ve also had a bad experience of having Hard Drives fail, and while I’ve had optical media fail too (Some bad Blu-Ray batches that deteriorated in a couple of years), the data loss is not as much as losing a whole hard drive. Remember to back-up your data!